Fringe development

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Express owner Desmond prepares to fly nest

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

South Wales industrial: Swan on song

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Lipton stays on at CABE

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Two more leave Chesterton

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Bargain Bromley

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Bourdais jilts Insignia

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

PREMIUMLight of day: Cornea donors on the rise

first_imgLinkedin Facebook Google Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ? It was almost pitch black; nothing was in sight. Seconds later, however, colors started to become visible as 19-year-old Savina Monica slowly opened her pair of perfectly-functioning eyes.”Ever since I was a kid, I’d tried to imagine how it felt to be blind,” she told The Jakarta Post.What Savina imagined was an everyday reality for millions of Indonesians suffering from blindness.They included 3 percent of the country’s above 50-year-old population, according to Rapid Assessment of Avoidable Blindness (RAAB) data collected between 2014 and 2016 in 15 provinces across the country.Some of these elderly people suffer from curable blindness: about 80 percent caused by cataracts and 4.5 percent by corneal blindness.This means they might be able to see the light of the day if they undergo surgery… Topics : eye-surgery EyesightProblems cornea cornea-donor blind blindless blind-people donationlast_img read more

UK to close schools, put troops on standby as coronavirus deaths rise

first_imgTopics : “After schools shut their gates from Friday afternoon, they will remain closed,” he told his daily news conference.Exceptions will be made for the children of key workers — including healthcare staff, police and delivery drivers — and for the most vulnerable children.Johnson earlier this week advised people to work from home and avoid unnecessary social contact and travel, warning the infection rate was starting to spike.On Wednesday he said this was having an effect but repeated advice for people with symptoms to self-isolate for between one and two weeks, depending on circumstances.  Britain announced Wednesday it would be closing schools in the coming days and placing 20,000 troops on standby in efforts to stem the spread of coronavirus, as the death toll topped 100.Prime Minister Boris Johnson had held off following the lead of other European countries because of the impact it would have on the workforce.But as the outbreak spreads and the death toll reached 104, up from 71 in a day, he said schools would be closed indefinitely later this week. Parliamentary hotspotLawmakers were earlier told to stay away from Johnson’s weekly question time in parliament amid warnings that Westminster is a particularly infectious area.Some 25 MPs, including a cabinet minister, are already thought to have isolated themselves. “There’s a lot of COVID-19 in Westminster,” tweeted epidemiologist Professor Neil Ferguson, a government adviser, as he announced that he had also developed symptoms.But MPs will gather on Thursday to debate new emergency legislation to deal with the coronavirus outbreak, which ministers hope to push through within days.The government says its powers will only be used when “absolutely necessary” and the bill has support from opposition parties.But some MPs voiced concern at the sweeping nature and duration of the proposals, and the effect on civil liberties. center_img “We will not hesitate to bring forward further and faster measures,” he added.On Wednesday evening the Ministry of Defense (MoD) announced that 20,000 military personnel were being placed at “higher readiness” to help public services as part of a “COVID Support Force”.Defense secretary Ben Wallace said the armed forces “stand ready to protect Britain”.The MoD said reservists would be called up and 150 military personnel trained to drive oxygen tankers to support the health service, if needed.Speculation is rife that London in particular could soon be subject to more draconian measures, as the capital records the most number of cases.”We know London is ahead of the rest of us so we may see more stringent measures than even those that we have announced so far,” Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said in Edinburgh earlier.The government will on Thursday introduce legislation giving it emergency powers to deal with the outbreak, including to close premises and restrict gatherings. Rent support Johnson’s government has come under pressure to do more to tackle the outbreak of COVID-19, given the tough lockdowns imposed in other European countries.But he insisted all action was driven by the science, adding: “We’re going to do the right measures at the right time.”So far Britain has around 2,600 cases, but chief scientific adviser Patrick Vallance this week warned that 55,000 Britons could have the virus at a “reasonable” estimate.The new social distancing advice sparked warnings that many businesses, particularly in the hospitality industry, could go bust.The FTSE 100 slumped again Wednesday, dropping as much as 5.0 percent in morning trade, while the pound hit its lowest level since 1985 against the dollar, touching US$1.1828.Finance minister Rishi Sunak on Tuesday announced a package of support for businesses, including government-backed loans of at least £330 billion ($395 billion, 360 billion euros).On Wednesday, Johnson also promised legislation to protect individuals unable to pay their rent because of job losses caused by the crisis from evictions. last_img read more

Italy, Vatican lower flags, observe silence to honor coronavirus dead

first_imgItalians marked a minute of silence and flags at government buildings were lowered to half mast on Tuesday to honor the thousands of victims of the coronavirus outbreak.The Vatican, a tiny city-state surrounded by Rome, lowered its own yellow-and-white flags. Italians on the other side of the border lowered their green, white and red national tri-color as well as the flags of their cities and of the European Union.The initiative was promoted by a group of mayors to show solidarity with the towns suffering the most in the north, the epicenter of the crisis. “All the mayors have gathered together in a kind of ideal embrace, most importantly to be close to the places that are suffering the most, where the virus has been the most ferocious, to be close to the mourning for those who have died,” Decaro said.The lockdown was due to end on Friday, but has been extended until sometime after Easter, which falls on April 12 this year.As the total number of dead on Tuesday rose by another 837 to well over 12,000, Decaro said the mayors’ initiative was a sign of respect for all suffering families.”We are trying to send a message of hope,” he said.  Italy is the world’s hardest hit country in terms of deaths and accounts for more than a third of all global fatalities.”This moment of silence of mayors, in which even the presidential palace and the Vatican participated, is an important moment for our country, showing unity from north to south,” said Antonio Decaro, mayor of the southern city of Bari, which so far has been spared the worst of the outbreak.Mayors wearing their official tri-colour sashes and some donning surgical masks looked on somberly as buglers played on empty streets that before the lockdown to try to contain the virus would have been packed with residents and tourists.Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro stood by the unusually still waters of a canal, free of boat traffic because of the national lockdown.center_img Topics :last_img read more