Category: vbecqsqo

Groundhog Day Stage Adaptation Sets B’way Opening Date

first_img Groundhog Day Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 17, 2017 Groundhog Day is coming to Broadway! Groundhog Day is coming to Broadway! Groundhog Day is coming to Broadway! The previously reported stage adaptation of the 1993 film by the creative team behind Matilda will begin performances on January 23, 2017 and officially open on March 9 at a theater to be confirmed. No word yet on casting. It has been speculated that the musical will make its world premiere at London’s Old Vic next year.Directed by Matthew Warchus, the tuner will have a book by Danny Rubin, who wrote the screenplay with Harold Ramis. The production will feature music and lyrics by Tim Minchin, choreography by Peter Darling, and set and costume design by Rob Howell.Groundhog Day follows TV weather man Phil (played by Bill Murray in the film), who reluctantly goes to cover the story of Punxsutawney Phil for the third year in a row. Making no effort to hide his frustration, he covers the story and moves on, expecting his job to be finished. However, he awakes the “following” day and discovers that it’s Groundhog Day again, and the fun happens again and again and again. He soon realizes he must take advantage of it in order to secure the love of a coworker. View Comments Related Showslast_img read more

Dominican Air Force Prepares to Protect the Civilian Population from Ebola

first_imgThe conference, “Ebola: Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Management and Biosafety” was designed specifically for health care workers who provide services in provinces with ports, airports and border crossings. Speakers at the training session included Dr. Raquel Pimentel, general director of epidemiology for the Ministry of Health; Dr. José Yunén, infectious disease specialist at the country’s Center for Diagnosis and Advanced Medicine (CEDIMAT), and Dr. Talía Flores, president of the Dominican Society of Infectious Diseases. Like the other branches of the Dominican Republic’s military, the DAF cooperates with the country’s police forces and other countries, such as the United States, in the fight against organized crime and international drug trafficking. However, protecting the civilian population from health threats is also part of the DAF’s responsibilities. As of October 29, there were more than 13,700 cases of Ebola, with more than 4,900 deaths, according to the World Health Organization. Almost all the cases have been in West Africa, with a handful in Europe and the United States. No instances of the disease have been reported in the Dominican Republic or in any other country in Latin America. Led by Col. Humberto José Brito Gómez, Internal Medicine specialist and deputy director of the hospital, the medical professionals in attendance discussed Ebola guidelines established by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). They were also shown an epidemiological and statistical analysis showing the seriousness of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The conference, “Ebola Management and Protocols according to the World Health and Pan American Health Organizations,” took place at the Dr. Ramón de Lara Military Hospital on October 10. It assisted the civilian population during an outbreak of cholera in November 2010, which emerged almost a year after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck the Dominican Republic’s neighbor, Haiti, in January 2010. That disaster caused severe damage to Haiti’s infrastructure and limited the country’s access to clean drinking water – a precursor to the appearance of cholera, which can come from ingesting tainted water. From there, the disease spread into the Dominican Republic. “In this situation, members of the Armed Forces participated with their team of epidemiologists,” Pou said. “Because these medical experts had been in different countries where the Dominican Republic participates in United Nations exercises, the doctors were familiar with how the outbreak spreads, precautionary measures and everything related to halting the cholera epidemic.” “The high level of preparation of physicians in the Armed Forces has allowed them to face important challenges in the health sector,” said Daniel Pou, a researcher at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in the Dominican Republic. “The Armed Forces hospital was used in this prevention exercise because of its large size, influence at the national level and highly qualified staff who work on prevention issues. ” A cooperative effort By Dialogo November 05, 2014 Physicians at the conference discussed the symptoms of Ebola, the best ways to diagnose the disease, and how to safely transport and treat patients who are infected with the virus. As of October 29, there were more than 13,700 cases of Ebola, with more than 4,900 deaths, according to the World Health Organization. Almost all the cases have been in West Africa, with a handful in Europe and the United States. No instances of the disease have been reported in the Dominican Republic or in any other country in Latin America. The Dominican Air Force (DAF) recently convened the medical community of the Armed Forces to prepare its response to the deadly Ebola virus. A humanitarian mission Physicians at the conference discussed the symptoms of Ebola, the best ways to diagnose the disease, and how to safely transport and treat patients who are infected with the virus. The Dominican Air Force (DAF) recently convened the medical community of the Armed Forces to prepare its response to the deadly Ebola virus. Like the other branches of the Dominican Republic’s military, the DAF cooperates with the country’s police forces and other countries, such as the United States, in the fight against organized crime and international drug trafficking. However, protecting the civilian population from health threats is also part of the DAF’s responsibilities. The Armed Forces are also coordinating with civilian government institutions to prepare for Ebola. Experience fighting deadly diseases The DAF has extensive experience responding to the outbreak of a deadly disease. “One is border surveillance to ensure that there is no significant permeability,” Pou said. “Another challenge is providing support to their highly qualified medical staff according to safety guidelines implemented before unexpected events occur.” The DAF has extensive experience responding to the outbreak of a deadly disease. On October 26, the Ministry of Health provided mass training on Ebola prevention to doctors and nurses in hospitals and private clinics, provincial health directors, epidemiologists, physicians who work at ports, airports and border crossings, and leaders of the provincial branches of the Dominican Medical College. A cooperative effort The conference, “Ebola Management and Protocols according to the World Health and Pan American Health Organizations,” took place at the Dr. Ramón de Lara Military Hospital on October 10. It assisted the civilian population during an outbreak of cholera in November 2010, which emerged almost a year after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck the Dominican Republic’s neighbor, Haiti, in January 2010. That disaster caused severe damage to Haiti’s infrastructure and limited the country’s access to clean drinking water – a precursor to the appearance of cholera, which can come from ingesting tainted water. From there, the disease spread into the Dominican Republic. The conference, “Ebola: Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Management and Biosafety” was designed specifically for health care workers who provide services in provinces with ports, airports and border crossings. Speakers at the training session included Dr. Raquel Pimentel, general director of epidemiology for the Ministry of Health; Dr. José Yunén, infectious disease specialist at the country’s Center for Diagnosis and Advanced Medicine (CEDIMAT), and Dr. Talía Flores, president of the Dominican Society of Infectious Diseases. If Ebola were to break out in the Dominican Republic, the DAF and other branches of the Armed Forces would provide the same kind of assistance they do during natural disasters: air and sea transport and logistical and medical support, including the deployment of mobile military hospitals. They would meet other challenges related to the disease as well. “In this situation, members of the Armed Forces participated with their team of epidemiologists,” Pou said. “Because these medical experts had been in different countries where the Dominican Republic participates in United Nations exercises, the doctors were familiar with how the outbreak spreads, precautionary measures and everything related to halting the cholera epidemic.” Experience fighting deadly diseases If Ebola were to break out in the Dominican Republic, the DAF and other branches of the Armed Forces would provide the same kind of assistance they do during natural disasters: air and sea transport and logistical and medical support, including the deployment of mobile military hospitals. They would meet other challenges related to the disease as well. On October 26, the Ministry of Health provided mass training on Ebola prevention to doctors and nurses in hospitals and private clinics, provincial health directors, epidemiologists, physicians who work at ports, airports and border crossings, and leaders of the provincial branches of the Dominican Medical College. A humanitarian mission The Armed Forces are also coordinating with civilian government institutions to prepare for Ebola. About 25,000 cases of cholera had been reported in the Dominican Republic at the time, including about 400 deaths. But the Dominican Republic’s military helped contain the epidemic. Led by Col. Humberto José Brito Gómez, Internal Medicine specialist and deputy director of the hospital, the medical professionals in attendance discussed Ebola guidelines established by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). They were also shown an epidemiological and statistical analysis showing the seriousness of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. About 25,000 cases of cholera had been reported in the Dominican Republic at the time, including about 400 deaths. But the Dominican Republic’s military helped contain the epidemic. “One is border surveillance to ensure that there is no significant permeability,” Pou said. “Another challenge is providing support to their highly qualified medical staff according to safety guidelines implemented before unexpected events occur.” “The high level of preparation of physicians in the Armed Forces has allowed them to face important challenges in the health sector,” said Daniel Pou, a researcher at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in the Dominican Republic. “The Armed Forces hospital was used in this prevention exercise because of its large size, influence at the national level and highly qualified staff who work on prevention issues. ”last_img read more

Ensuring Unity, Security, and Stability

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo February 09, 2017  Rear Admiral Sean S. Buck, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F), has a distinct and unwavering commitment to the maritime forces of the partner nations in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. His goal is clear: to foster unity and work with each as the maritime partner of choice in order to maintain the security and stability of the Western Hemisphere. Rear Adm. Buck’s commitment goes beyond his focus on the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) area of operations.In addition to working with partner nations, he is committed to ensuring his own personnel in Florida are 100 percent ready to do their best at all times. Since assuming command over USNAVSO/USFOURTHFLT in August 2016, the mission and responsibility, as he describes it, is essential for enhancing cooperative maritime security. Diálogo visited Rear Adm.Buck at Naval Station Mayport, Florida, where he spoke about his military efforts, engagements with SOUTHCOM’s partner nations and the regional security challenges they all face. Diálogo: What is U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command (USNAVSO)/U.S. 4th Fleet’s (FOURTHFLT) main focus with regard to our Area of Responsibility (AOR)? Rear Adm. Sean S. Buck: Our primary daily focus is to be sure that we maintain our security commitment to partners in our AOR. It’s to ensure they always know that we are steadfast in uniting with them to keep our entire region secure and stable.This focus takes a team effort. I encourage a teaming mentality so that we are able to achieve a high state of readiness and preparedness to respond to any kind of contingency or crises in the AOR; a crisis that may negatively affect our partners and/or possibly pose a risk to our own national security. Diálogo: What is the focus of your military efforts as commander of USNAVSO? Rear Adm. Buck: I continue to focus on the military imperatives that Admiral Kurt W. Tidd [SOUTHCOM Commander] has charged all of his team with. These imperatives support our partner nations’ efforts to improve execution of their duties.These four key military imperatives characterize any legitimate military that seeks to gain the trust of the population they serve. The first imperative is working jointly; having the ability to work among and with sister services and other government agencies within their country for a whole-of-government response.The U.S. military has recognized the importance of working jointly, and I believe it is a critical imperative to demonstrate to our partner militaries and government organizations. The professionalization of the Non-Commissioned Officer Corps (NCO) is also an important military imperative. We are very proud of how we empower our NCO in the United States military with responsibility and accountability. It is something we share and demonstrate with partners to enable them to be a more effective fighting force.The age-old imperative of following the principles of human rights is fundamental for successful militaries in our AOR. An operational military will never gain the trust and legitimacy they need from their population if there is any question of their commitment to human rights, or their desire to protect those rights. The fourth military imperative that we stress is gender integration; the integration of women in our military services across all military occupational specialties. I have a very good example of that integration; my deputy commander, Rear Admiral Linda R. Wackerman.As a U.S. Navy Reserve Officer, Rear Adm. Wackerman simultaneously juggles the duties of a senior naval leader and aviator, as well as working as a commercial airline pilot. Her valuable experience and professionalism is an asset to our command – I am extremely proud to partner with her in execution of our mission. Demonstrating the effectiveness of gender integration to our partners through our own example enforces the importance of women serving in military forces.Diálogo: What do you expect to achieve with each country in SOUTHCOM’s AOR you engage with, whether through exercises, key leader engagements, or any other engagement? Rear Adm. Buck: Most importantly, I expect to earn the trust of our partner nations. It’s the very first thing I think about as I partner either bilaterally or in a multinational group effort.I must demonstrate my commitment to our relationships and reiterate why I want to partner with our counterparts in Central, South America and the Caribbean. We are more effective and achieve higher levels of success when we work alongside each other toward our goals of security, stability, and unity in our hemisphere. The United States chooses not to do it alone.When we work together and leverage our strengths, we will win and prosper together. I am fairly new as a commander in Mayport; as I go downrange to introduce myself, my focus is to ensure my partners feel they can trust me and trust my team. I hope my efforts encourage them to partner with us. Thus far, I have had the opportunity to travel to El Salvador, Panama, Colombia, and Chile. My experiences in those four nations have been wonderful. I was warmly welcomed, and I believe I accomplished my goals there and gained their trust. I built friendships with my counterparts and we have already been able to reach out to wish our partner militaries well and a happy holiday season. It has been exciting so far, so I’m looking forward to the future.With regard to exercises, the one I am most proud of, and the one that I am solely responsible for is UNITAS. We spread the hosting responsibilities of the exercise around our AOR to have a different host each year. Last year, Panama was the host; it was the first time a Central America nation has hosted UNITAS in 67 years. We did that to ensure we build confidence and the capacity to lead multinational operations across all of our partners in Latin America.We also participate in TRADEWINDS to increase the capabilities and capacities of our Caribbean-nation friends. All the exercises are very important, either on a bilateral or multilateral level, where we invite not only the nations from our AOR but also other Pacific, European, or African countries to come [take part], as the global nature of the threats these days are transnational and transregional; they originate from all over the globe.Diálogo: What is your biggest concern in terms of regional security in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean? Rear Adm. Buck: There are two things that I am pretty worried about, that keep me up at night. First, I am concerned about terrorist networks leveraging the existing illicit drug trade routes that have been around for a long time to flow money, weapons, foreign terrorists, drugs, etc. through our partner nations and into the southern part of the United States.It seems to be too easy to use these pathways that drug cartels have been using for decades – these networks are a serious threat to regional security and require multinational efforts to thwart them. Second, I have concerns about the breakdown of governance in any of our partner nations that could lead to a mass migration of people. Mass migration, as well as natural disasters, could cause a disruption and threaten our regional stability and negatively impact our prosperity. We share common interests and goals with the people of Latin America – I worry that successful threat networks, unsuccessful governance or any variety of natural disaster could have a devastating impact on the peace, security and stability we work so hard to achieve in our homelands.Diálogo: Having been in the position of Commander for six months (since August 2016), how has your perspective of the AOR changed since you first assumed command? Rear Adm. Buck: It hasn’t changed significantly. I have some prior experience in this AOR. My first six months have brought me a deeper respect for our partners, their capabilities, strengths, and friendship, and more specifically, a better knowledge of who they are, what they do, and what their navies are capable of doing.So [there hasn’t been] a huge change in my perspective, just a deepening of my respect and knowledge. Diálogo: How has/does the relationship you help build benefit the collaboration between the U.S. Navy and those of our regional partner nations? Rear Adm. Buck: The collaboration is getting much stronger, as well as the individual military capacities of the United States and our partners.I think the biggest indicator of how much stronger it’s getting is the ownership each of our partners’ take for their own security, prosperity, and stability. In years past, my predecessors used to get a lot of phone calls to request assistance when something bad happened in our area of operations. What I am seeing now is fewer phone calls; when a crisis happens in a partner nation, they are responding and assisting their populations more effectively than in the past.This is an exciting development because it shows an increase in confidence – our efforts to build capacity, enhance preparedness and stress military imperatives are having a positive effect. We are seeing that, and I am very happy with it. We will continue to be prepared to respond if we are asked, and we always volunteer to serve in a consulting or advisory role. We will continue to exercise with them, but it’s great to see our counterparts take as much ownership as they do these days.Diálogo: What kind of results do you expect to come to fruition for 2017, and what results have you seen so far in your time working with this AOR? Rear Adm. Buck: I have three major accomplishments I’d like to make happen in 2017. First, I want to complete key leader engagements with every partner nation in the AOR; a chance to introduce myself, meet them and an opportunity to develop mutual trust. This is achieved by visiting their nations or inviting them here to Mayport and learning about our respective maritime forces.Second, for my USNAVSO/FOURTHFLT team, I want to increase our operational preparedness for rapid response. This is a critical skill we must be able to execute when our partners or our own nation are counting on our support or advice if a disaster strikes. Third, I aim to enhance the complexity and sophistication of our exercises, such as PANAMAX and UNITAS.We get better by actual at-sea operations; challenging ourselves and our partners to operate together and build our repertoire of maritime skills. We can’t become complacent by just exercising ashore. The threats to our stability and security are evolving, so we need to be on top of our game and ready for any scenario.We do this by sharing knowledge and improving our multinational cooperation. Diálogo: How has your prior experience prepared you for this role? And what lessons learned did you bring with you to this role, especially after serving as the JS J5 Chief of Staff, assisting the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in his role as principal military adviser to the President of the United States and the Secretary of Defense? Rear Adm. Buck: My past experience has laid the foundation for success in my new role.I am a maritime patrol aviator. I have many years of operational experience, flying our detection and monitoring missions in the counter-narcotics mission set. My time on the Joint Staff gave me a greater appreciation of the geopolitical issues that are going on in the AOR as well as the political-military relationships. My time in the Pentagon, specifically on the Joint Staff and J5, gave me a solid education on the importance of partnerships and a greater appreciation for the varying cultures of the world.Diálogo: Anything you’d like to add for our regional readers? Rear Adm. Buck: I’d like to remind them of my command’s motto: “Unity, security, and stability.” That is my strategic focus in commanding USNAVSO/FOURTHFLT; to improve the unity of my own team and my team with our partners, and to ensure the security and stability of our entire region. I hope when they see our logo, it serves as a reminder of that commitment and a reminder of what we stand for.last_img read more

ABA okays Stetson plan to offer classes in Tampa

first_img July 1, 2001 Regular News ABA okays Stetson plan to offer classes in Tampa ABA okays Stetson plan to offer classes in Tampa The American Bar Association has voted to allow St. Petersburg-based Stetson University College of Law to establish a part-time Juris Doctor degree program in Tampa. Dean Gary Vause, however, said the college has made no decisions on the new campus’ physical location and several sites remain under consideration. The college expects to welcome its first entering class of part-time students in August 2002. “With the establishment of a part-time program in Tampa, we will be able to significantly broaden our reach to a diverse group of professionals, who, because of work and family obligations, may not otherwise have been able to pursue a legal education,” Vause said. “Now, working women and men representing many cultures, ages, and ethnic groups from Sarasota to Hernando to Polk and Orange Counties, will be able to follow their dream of attaining a Juris Doctor degree here in Tampa at Stetson.” Vause said launching the part-time program across the bay “is a momentous time” for both Stetson and the Tampa Bay community. “As Florida’s first and oldest law school, Stetson has been producing lawyers, judges, and other leaders in the legal profession for 100 years, longer than any other law school in this state,” Vause said. “Since 1954, we have been Tampa Bay’s law school.” Vause said more than 2,700 Stetson graduates currently live and work within the Tampa Bay community, with thousands more located throughout the state, the nation, and the world. A Stetson Tampa campus has been one of Vause’s personal goals since being named dean in 1999. That same year, the college applied to the ABA to establish a part-time program in Tampa. Because of the high concentration of minority professionals working in Tampa, Vause said Stetson’s Tampa program will serve to promote diversity in the legal profession, and the college has begun fundraising efforts to establish scholarships for minority applicants. Students will attend classes Monday through Thursday evenings, and on Saturday mornings. The J.D. degree may be earned through a minimum of four years of study in the part-time program, and if necessary, may be extended up to six years, according to the school. Students in the part-time program will be subject to the same rigorous standards of learning that are applied to the full-time program students. The college will immediately begin accepting applications for the part-time August 2002 class through February 15, 2002. Because applications must include results of the Law School Admissions Test, interested students are advised to register as soon as possible for this exam. Stetson expects to admit one entering class of 50-60 students each fall semester. Those entering classes will be in addition to Stetson’s full-time entering classes, which are admitted each fall, spring, and summer. Tuition for the part-time program will be equivalent to that for the full-time program and will be prorated over the four years of the part-time program. Accordingly, part-time students will pay the same tuition per credit hour as full-time students, who pay $21,000 a year. The curriculum will be virtually identical to that taken by full-time students and the school expects that required courses will be taught by members of Stetson’s full-time faculty; elective courses will be taught by full-time faculty and adjunct professors. Students should also have an opportunity to participate in a wide variety of extracurricular activities, such as law review, student government, and various clubs.last_img read more

Save a little, share a little – Member benefits

first_imgEach day as we head to work, credit unions are uniquely positioned with the ‘people helping people’ philosophy and mindset…and we mean it!  We strive to make the very best decisions to assist our credit unions members with their financial needs…and so much more!There are additional ways that we can assist by providing products and services they may already be utilizing, aiding in building member loyalty and enhancing the value of membership.  As a member reviews your website, do you provide member benefits outside of the credit union itself?  Here are two easy member benefits offered through CU Solutions Group that can provide great savings for your member, your co-workers and you.Enhance the value of membership with TurboTax®.The Love My Credit Union® Rewards TurboTax program provides your members with savings of up to $15 on TurboTax federal products. The program also helps you enhance the value of members and build member loyalty. Many of your members may already be using TurboTax and not getting a discount. Help your members save on TurboTax this coming tax season. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Serge Gnabry reveals he defied Arsene Wenger by leaving Arsenal

first_imgSerge Gnabry reveals he defied Arsene Wenger by leaving Arsenal Comment Gnabry is now a regular for Germany (Picture: Getty)‘In my heart, I wanted to stay,’ Gnabry told ESPN.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘I always believed that I had what it takes to play for Arsenal, but these things are not always down to you.“It was a tough decision [to return to Germany] but it was a logical one,” he said. “I needed to play to get ahead.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalGnabry is now a regular for club and country and looks set to fill the void left by Arjen Robben when he leaves the Allianz at the end of the season.Arsenal received around £6m from his departure to Werder.MORE: Santi Cazorla rates Unai Emery’s first season at Arsenal Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 30 Mar 2019 12:50 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Advertisement Serge Gnabry insisted he wanted to stay at Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Bayern Munich winger Serge Gnabry admits he defied Arsene Wenger by leaving Arsenal, who were keen to tie him down to a new deal at the Emirates.The German joined Werder Bremen in 2016 in a move that was orchestrated by Bayern, who purchased him a year later at a cut-price fee.Wenger handed Gnabry his Arsenal debut as a 17-year-old but a disastrous loan spell at West Brom, where his fitness was regularly called into question, put his career at the Emirates in danger.Nevertheless, Wenger wanted Gnabry to sign a new deal as he believed in his long-term potential but the German has revealed he felt he needed to leave the club.ADVERTISEMENT Advertisementlast_img read more

Grand home on the river to go to auction

first_img14 Regatta Cres, DouglasThe five bedroom, four bathroom, three car home is on 814 sqm of land in a tranquil, river front setting.Keyes & Co Property owner Damien Keyes is marketing the property and said the house was the epitome of elegance.“It has real street presence and it has that big, circular drive and then there is the real statement staircase but inside it’s also very practical and has a really good family friendly layout,” he said. “There is guest quarters downstairs with your own bathroom and then upstairs you have the other three big bedrooms.“I think elegance is the best word for this house and it really has the wow factors as well s being a great entertainer’s home with a big kitchen in the heart of the home.”More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020The home features architectural design with high-calibre finishes which will appeal to the top end of the market. 14 Regatta Cres, DouglasA GRAND home on the banks of the Ross River in the sought after suburb of Douglas will be Sold under the hammer.14 Regatta Crescent will go to auction on October 23 and is expected to draw interest from high-end house hunters wanting to buy into the tightly held pocket of properties along the river. 14 Regatta Cres, DouglasThe house is being sold for the first time with the owner moving.There is more than 500 sqm of under roof space.Mr Keyes said he had received interest from a range of buyers.“We’ve had a couple of families as well as some external interest from outside Townsville of people looking to move here,” he said.“When you’re promoting properties of this calibre you also get those high end buyers than tend to bounce between North Ward, Castle Hill and then the river along Douglas.”The master suite of the house has river and park views, a large and luxurious ensuite and walk-in wardrobe. 14 Regatta Cres, DouglasThere is also a home office on the ground floor, a formal theatre room on the second level with built-in speakers throughout the house and outside an in-ground swimming pool has direct access to a shower and toilet. 14 Regatta Cres will be open for inspection on Saturday from 11.15am to 11.45am and Monday 5.15pm to 5.45pm. For more information call Damien Keyes on 0418 781 421.last_img read more

Questions over parental leave extension costs

first_imgNZ Herald 17 Oct 2012Major discrepancies in the cost of extending paid parental leave from 14 weeks to six months have emerged at the select committee examining the bill.The MP sponsoring it, Labour MP Sue Moroney, today told the government administration select committee it had a duty to get to the bottom of the discrepancies.Finance Minister Bill English gave notice on April 11 that he would exercise a financial veto to prevent the bill being passed on the basis that it would cost $500 million over three to four years.Sue Moroney said the Department of Labour at the time estimated the cost at $285 million.Now the committee had been given estimates by officials that it would cost $166 million over three years.She believed Mr English had been premature in announcing he would apply the veto.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10841116last_img read more

Four arrests after patient abuse caught on film

first_img Share Share Sharing is caring! Share HealthInternationalLifestylePrint Four arrests after patient abuse caught on film by: – June 1, 2011center_img Tweet 25 Views   no discussions Secret filming caught patients being dragged and slapped by support workersPolice in Bristol have arrested four people after secret filming by BBC Panorama found a pattern of serious abuse at a residential hospital.Winterbourne View treats people with learning disabilities and autism.Andrew McDonnell, who works with adults with mental disabilities, labelled some of the examples seen on film “torture”.All four have been released on police bail. The hospital’s owners, Castlebeck, have apologised and suspended 13 employees.Care Services Minister Paul Burstow said government regulator, the Care Quality Commission (CQC), had been asked to conduct an urgent investigation.Avon and Somerset police confirmed that three men – aged 42, 30 and 25 – and a 24-year-old woman were arrested as part of their ongoing investigation into the hospital.During five weeks spent filming undercover, Panorama’s reporter captured footage of some of the hospital’s most vulnerable patients being repeatedly pinned down, slapped, dragged into showers while fully clothed, taunted and teased.Patients punishedThe hospital is a privately owned, purpose-built, 24-bed facility and is taxpayer-funded.NHS South West said it was “appalled” by the issues raised surrounding the care home.In a statement, it said: “We always expect safe, high quality care from providers of services and the abuse of vulnerable patients is totally unacceptable.”Mr McDonnell, a clinical psychologist who viewed the footage, told the programme that basic techniques for dealing with patients with challenging behaviour were ignored.He said he was shocked by some of the treatment of vulnerable patients.After seeing footage of an 18-year-old patient named Simone being verbally abused and doused with cold water while fully clothed as a punishment, he said: “This is not a jail… people are not here to be punished.“This is a therapeutic environment. Where’s the therapy in any of this? I would argue this is torture.”Simone’s parents told the programme that she had told them she was being abused at the hospital, but they had assured her that it would not be allowed to happen.“She told us that she had been hit, her hair had been pulled and she’d been kicked – and I said no, this wouldn’t happen, they’re not allowed,” said the patient’s mother.Professor Jim Mansell, from the University of Kent and a government adviser on the use of physical restraint for those with developmental disabilities, said that from the footage it appeared that staff were “waiting to pounce on people and restrain them”.“This is the worst kind of institutional care. It is the kind of thing that was prevalent at the end of the 60s and that led Britain to gradually close the large, long-stay institutions,” he added.Warnings ignored The programme decided to film secretly after being approached by a former senior nurse at the hospital who was deeply concerned about the behaviour of some of the support workers caring for patients.“I have seen a lot over 35 years but this I have never seen anything like this. It is the worst I have seen,” former nurse Terry Bryan told the programme.Joe Casey said filming the abuse was the hardest thing he’d done. “These are all people’s sons, daughters, parents, aunties, uncles. These are all people who have got families… the families themselves do not know what goes on there.”Mr Bryan reported his concerns to both management at Winterbourne View and to the CQC, but his complaint was not taken up.Ian Biggs, regional director of the CQC for the southwest, said an opportunity to prevent abuse was missed when Mr Bryan’s complaints were not investigated.“Had we acted at that time, as we have done now, we can act very quickly to cease that kind of treatment.“We missed that chance and we are sorry for that and we’re doing everything we can now to make sure we’re responding properly.”In a statement, the Care Quality Commission said, following an internal review, it recognised that “there were indications of problems at this hospital which should have led to us taking action sooner”.“We apologise to those who have been let down by our failure to act more swiftly to address the appalling treatment that people at this hospital were subjected to,” it said.Mr Burstow said people deserve to receive “safe and effective care” from every care provider.He also said he had “confirmed with CQC that they should undertake a series of unannounced inspections of services for people with learning disabilities.”Castlebeck has launched an internal investigation into their whistle-blower procedures and are reviewing the records of all 580 patients in 56 facilities.The vulnerable patients filmed by Panorama have been moved to safety.The hospital charges taxpayers an average of £3,500 per patient per week and Castlebeck has an annual turnover of £90m.Chief executive Lee Reed told the programme he was “ashamed” by what had happened.“All I can do is unreservedly apologise to both the families and the vulnerable adults that have been involved in this and recommit to making sure this doesn’t happen again,” he said.Panorama reporter Joe Casey said he was shocked by what he witnessed.“On a near-daily basis, I watched as some of the very people entrusted with the care of society’s most vulnerable targeted patients – often, it seemed, for their own amusement. They are scenes of torment that are not easily forgotten,” he said.South Gloucestershire Council said it “takes all allegations of abuse and mistreatment of vulnerable adults very seriously”.In a statement, it said: “Our immediate concern is always for the safety and welfare of patients.“As soon as the SAB [Safeguarding Adults Board] were made aware of these allegations at Winterbourne View… appropriate action was taken in line with established procedures and protocols.”Panorama’s Undercover Care: The Abuse Exposed was broadcast on BBC One on Tuesday 31 May at 2100 BST and is available to view in the UK on the BBC iPlayer.BBC Newslast_img read more

Lady Bulldogs Soccer Award Winners

first_imgAward Winners from the 2013/2014 Batesville Girl’s Soccer TeamOffensive MVP – Mary Elizabeth Elkins.Defensive Co-MVP – Rebecca Roell and Abby Brandt.Team MVP – Brooke Rohlfing.Bulldog Award – Kelli Hartman.All-EIAC – Mary Gutzwiller, Brooke Rohlfing, Abby Brandt, Rebecca Roell, and Mary Elizabeth Elkins.1st Team All-District – Mary Elizabeth Elkins.Academic All – State – Kelsey Gausman, Kelli Hartman, Rebecca Roell, and Megan Doll.Top Team Player – Whitney Lambert.Reserve Bulldog Award – Molly Weigel.Submitted by Batesville Coach Kyle Laker.last_img read more