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Stock market crash: I believe this FTSE 100 share is a bargain buy now

first_img Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Manika Premsingh | Wednesday, 6th May, 2020 | More on: ULVR Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Last week, as the FTSE 100 closed above 6,000 for the first time in over a month, I sat wondering if the stock market crash was indeed past its worst. Apparently not. The FTSE 100 index fell in three of the last four sessions at the time of writing. The Warren Buffett strategyAnd that’s not all. Incoming numbers on the economy are dismal. According to an Office of National Statistics (ONS) survey, all businesses that are still running say their turnover has fallen. The majority of them expect the situation to worsen or stay the same as the lockdown continues to create economic uncertainty. Even Warren Buffett is  sounding worried, according to a New York Times report. In fact, he reportedly sat it out during the stock market crash and invested exclusively in US Treasury bills.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…FTSE 100 and economic growthSo what’s an investor to do when the economy just isn’t supporting stock markets? It’s true that the worst is yet to come for the economy. But on the bright side, stock markets themselves can well be a ‘leading indicator’ for economic trends. In other words, they can foretell what’s next for the economy.So, for instance, the stock market crash took place before a recession showed up in macroeconomic numbers. In fact, it still hasn’t. Economy data’s released with a lag. The latest three-month rolling GDP estimate shows 0.1% growth, which is an improvement over the past two prints, but the number is until February. We all know what’s happened since. Investing in growth shares in the stock market crashThis means that investors can have some confidence about what’s ahead, even if the immediate future looks scary. High-quality FTSE 100 stocks are a safe bet right now, I believe. After the small FTSE 100 correction in the past few days, some stocks have become more attractive than they were earlier. One of these is the FTSE 100 consumer goods giant Unilever (LSE: ULVR), which touched its lowest share price since the start of April yesterday. This brought it 10% below the level it was at two months ago. But it’s not just the broader trend that’s bringing ULVR down. It’s results released two weeks ago are disappointing. Its sales have shown zero growth, and in light of the coronavirus crisis, it has withdrawn its growth guidance for 2020. However, I still think it’s a great buy. For one,  its sale of domestic hygiene and in-home food products is seeing an upswing, even while other segments are lagging. This is far more than many other businesses can say. Two, it also mentions its strong balance sheet and cash position, both of which are positives for long-term investors. Three, its long-term share price history inspires confidence in ULVR’s ability to allow for capital apprecation overtime. ULVR’s pricier in absolute terms than many other FTSE 100 companies, but it holds potential to give great returns. I think it’s worth buying.  Enter Your Email Addresscenter_img I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Image source: Getty Images Stock market crash: I believe this FTSE 100 share is a bargain buy now  Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Unilever. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. See all posts by Manika Premsinghlast_img read more

Watch: Sevu Reece kick creates incredible try for Crusaders

first_img Watch: Sevu Reece kick creates incredible try for CrusadersIt’s been torment for some rugby fans, waiting for Super Rugby Aotearoa to roll round again. And the opening tie of this new season did not disappoint as the reigning champ Crusaders downed the Highlanders 26-13. And among the highlights was one try worth drooling over.Check out this Bryn Hall five-pointer, made by quick hands and a savvy, hooked kick back into midfield from All Blacks wing Sevu Reece. Magical stuff. Check out this cracking try in Super Rugby Aotearoa LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Reece also got a try on his own – and fellow wing Leicester Fainga’anuku deserves credit for his work in the match. However, it was the kick from the roaming Reece that bagged a lot of the attention.Related: Who will broadcast Super Rugby in the UK in 2021? Man of the moment, Sevu Reece (Getty Images) For all of the excitement around this game, though, Highlanders boss Tony Brown was unimpressed with one aspect of the game.Crusaders not only attacked ruthlessly, but they put in a real rearguard shift. Something necessary, after receiving two yellow cards (including recent friendlies, the Crusaders have five yellows in two game). After this one, Brown talked about cynical play.Related: Super Rugby Aotearoa team guide“If you look at tonight’s game that’s what’s sad about rugby at the minute,” Brown said post-match. “We had 60% possession, 60% territory… We only concede eight penalties and they’re conceding 19 penalties and numerous penalty advantages against them and then two yellow cards and they still win. That’s the sad thing about footy.”After the game, Crusaders coach Scott Robertson denied there was anything cynical about the Crusaders’ play, and also singled out forwards coach Jason Ryan for how well the All Black-laden pack handled their defensive and set-piece duties. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

England: Synod approves next steps for women to become bishops

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Church of England press release] The General Synod of the Church of England has Nov. 20 approved a package of measures as the next steps to enable women to become bishops.In the debate in the morning session the synod welcomed the package of proposals outlined in the report of the Steering Committee for the Draft Legislation of Women in the Episcopate (GS 1924).The Steering Committee’s package of proposals follows the mandate set by the synod in July and includes the first draft of a House of Bishops declaration and a disputes resolution procedure. This debate invited synod to welcome the proposals and the five guiding principles, already agreed by the House of Bishops, which underpin them.Proposing the package of measures Bishop James Langstaff of Rochester said: “These measures look to the day when the Church of England as an ecclesial entity will have made a clear decision to open all orders of ministry to women and men without distinction, whereby all those so ordained are true and lawful holders of the office which they occupy.”The following motion was carried this morning with 378 votes for, eight against and 25 abstentions:‘That this Synod, welcoming the package of proposals in GS 1924 and the statement of principles endorsed by the House of Bishops at paragraph 12 of GS 1886, invite the House of Bishops to bring to the Synod for consultation in February a draft declaration and proposals for a mandatory disputes resolution procedure which build on the agreement reached by the Steering Committee as a result of its facilitated discussions.”In its afternoon session, the synod also voted to progress the legislation to the next legislative stage of revision at its meeting in February 2014.As a result of the votes carried today, synod has agreed to dispense with the normal Revision Committee process and move straight to revision in full at synod which next meets in February 2014, thereby clearing the way for a possible vote on final approval later in 2014. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Women’s Ministry Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Nov 20, 2013 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest England: Synod approves next steps for women to become bishops Tags Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (1) Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL November 20, 2013 at 10:34 pm Justice delayed is justice denied!The ONLY reason women have not been ordained priests and bishops from the early days of the Christian Way, is that women were not considered fully human. Men, perhaps out of a need to control what they fear, kept women identified as a “thing” which BELONGED to a man.We know better now. We are having our own “Galileo moment” concerning the way God actually has created the human race, as opposed (where necessary) to what the Biblical writers thought and wrote. Women are fully human, neither things belonging to a neighbor (the 10th commandment) nor just dirt in which men plant their seed (Ps. 139:14-15).William J. Fleener, Sr.Priest of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Michigan The Rev. William J. Fleener, Sr. says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

What the Anglican Church of Canada’s same-sex marriage vote means…

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Sydney Brouillard-Coyle (left), a youth delegate from the Diocese of Huron who identifies as gender non-conforming, queer and asexual, receives a blessing from Primate Linda Nicholls at the closing Eucharist of General Synod 2019. Photo: Geoff Howe/Anglican Journal[Anglican Journal] The Anglican Church of Canada General Synod’s failure to pass a resolution to amend the marriage canon to expressly allow solemnization of same-sex marriage, followed by a communiqué from the House of Bishops effectively commending diocese-based decisions on the matter, has triggered a wave of responses across the church. Bishops, priests, laity, officers and deacons alike have weighed in with concerns about the decision. Some bishops, including then-Primate-elect Linda Nicholls in her capacity as bishop of Huron, have outlined plans to exercise a local option for same-sex marriage in their dioceses. Resolution A052-R2, for the second reading of an amendment to Canon XXI on marriage in the church, failed to achieve a required two-thirds majority vote in all three orders of General Synod. While two-thirds of the Order of Laity (80.9%) and Order of Clergy (73.2%) voted in favor of the resolution, less than two-thirds (62.2%) voted in favor in the Order of Bishops. The final breakdown of the vote, which took place on July 12 at the Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre, was as follows: The Order of Laity saw 89 members (80.9%) vote “Yes” and 21 members (19.1%) vote “No,” with one abstention. The Order of Clergy had 60 members (73.2%) voting “Yes,” 22 members (26.8%) voting “No,” and two abstentions. In the Order of Bishops, 23 members (62.2%) voted “Yes” and 14 members (37.8%) voted “No,” with two abstentions. In statements released after the vote, multiple dioceses declared their intention to perform same-sex marriages regardless of the marriage canon vote—basing their decisions on General Synod’s approval of the document “A Word to the Church,” which affirms “diverse understandings of the existing marriage canon” and that “the existing canon does not prohibit same-sex marriage.” The initial announcement of the vote results left many synod members visibly in shock, with some crying. Almost immediately, delegates approached the microphones and asked about the process by which General Synod could reconsider a vote. But Primate Fred Hiltz, acknowledging the “pain in this place,” soon moved to dismiss synod for the night. The emotional upheaval caused by the results led to official statements from all levels of the church. First to respond on July 15 was the House of Bishops, whose members had played the decisive role in voting against the motion. “We, members of the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada, see the pain and anguish inflicted on LGBTQ2S+ people, on members of the General Synod, across the church, and in the world, as a result of the work and the vote on the matter of Canon XXI, concerning marriage,” the bishops’ statement read. “We see your tears, we hear your cries, and we weep with you. We have caused deep hurt. We are profoundly sorry.” The bishops noted that General Synod had “overwhelmingly approved” the “A Word to the Church” document and that the bishops affirmed the right of Indigenous peoples and communities to “spiritual self-determination in their discernment and decisions in all matters.” But perhaps most consequential was their declaration that different levels of the church may make their own decisions on the matter of same-sex marriage. “We are walking together,” the bishops wrote, “in a way which leaves room for individual dioceses and jurisdictions of our church to proceed with same-sex marriage according to their contexts and convictions, sometimes described as ‘local option.’” Prolocutor Cynthia Haines-Turner and deputy prolocutor Peter Wall next released a statement which acknowledged the “pain, hurt and anguish of many people in this General Synod and beyond, particularly in the LGBTQ2S+ community, their families and friends,” and noted the support of synod for the affirmations in “A Word to the Church.”Their statement also alluded to a proposed constitutional review before the next General Synod in 2022, later adopted by General Synod as Resolution C005. The prolocutor and deputy prolocutor, it said, “strongly endorse the proposed actions of this Synod calling for work, in the next triennium, on our governance structures, size and composition of synod, and planning for the future.” A third statement came from clergy and lay delegates at General Synod, who noted that their respective orders had voted “by overwhelming majorities” in favor of the marriage canon amendment, and that they were “saddened and dismayed” that the change had been blocked by the vote in the Order of Bishops. The lay and clergy delegates who signed the statement affirmed “the full inclusion of LGBTQ2S+ people in the life, leadership, liturgies and sacraments, including marriage, of the Anglican Church of Canada.” Basing their statement on “A Word to the Church,” they affirmed that “same-sex marriage can and will proceed by local option.” They apologized for the “hurt and harm that has been caused by the actions of this synod and by our church to LGBTQ2S+ people” and called for the church to “end this harm.” As the vote revealed, the Anglican Church of Canada is not of universal opinion on same-sex marriage. On July 18, the Arctic House of Bishops — which includes some of the most outspoken opponents of the failed marriage canon amendment — released a statement declaring that General Synod “has given us permission to decide for ourselves what direction we should take. We choose now to walk as the self-determining Anglican Church of Canada in the Arctic.” Concerns that this statement meant the diocese might be leaving the church prompted a clarifying statement from the Arctic bishops: “The Diocese of the Arctic remains a diocese within the Anglican Church of Canada, but must distance itself from those who violate the marriage canon. The implication of this is a state of ‘impaired communion.’ By using the phrase ‘self-determining,’ we are reserving the right not to affirm or submit to decisions that violate the doctrine of the church on marriage.” Speaking to the Anglican Journal, Bishop David Parsons highlighted the mission statement of the Arctic diocese and its right to self-determination in line with biblical teachings. “We have not left,” Parsons reiterated. “We are following the teachings that have gone down through the centuries…ever since the missionaries first came to the Arctic and brought the gospel which we as Arctic people embrace. We’re continuing that, and as weak as we are, we will continue to seek God.” “The Anglican General Synod has given us permission as an Indigenous church to determine what we’ll do, and we are exercising that right,” he added. “I would be very sad to hear if the Anglican Church of Canada, because we are now exercising that right, did anything to try to kick us out. The problem is, we’re not leaving. But we’re not following false teachings.” The Association of Anglican Deacons in Canada board released its own statement on July 20, noting that the process and decision on the marriage canon vote had been “shocking, hurtful, frustrating and deeply disappointing” for many deacons. The statement expressed confusion over the failure to change the canon by a “small minority of our church,” whom they described as “holding the church back from joyfully offering everyone, without restriction, the sacrament of marriage. This ‘no’ to same-sex marriage seems devastating to our work as deacons.” It pointed again to the affirmations in A Word to the Church, the continued blessing of same-sex marriages using the “local option,” and forthcoming efforts to review the governance structures of General Synod. In the wake of the vote, bishops and archbishops in numerous dioceses expressed their plans to offer marriage rites to same-sex couples through the local option, all citing the affirmations in A Word to the Church. Among these diocesan leaders was Archbishop Ron Cutler, who said in a Facebook post that he would use his episcopal authority to do so in the Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Archbishop Melissa Skelton released a pastoral letter saying that she would authorize the marriage of same-sex couples within the Diocese of New Westminster beginning Aug. 1, subject to certain conditions such as the approval of parish councils. Bishop John Chapman declared in a statement that the Diocese of Ottawa would continue the practice of allowing same-sex marriage with the bishop’s permission. Of these diocesan statements, perhaps the most significant was that of then-Primate-elect Linda Nicholls. In a statement to the Diocese of Huron, Nicholls authorized marriage to same-sex couples as a pastoral local option starting Aug. 1 in her capacity as diocesan bishop, under certain guidelines. These include stipulations that no parish be required to perform same-sex marriages if it does not wish to do so, and that clergy have the provision by canon to refuse to perform a marriage due to reason of conscience. “Our church has a wonderful diversity in so many areas of its life,” Nicholls wrote. “That diversity also leads to tensions but I can promise you that the bishops, clergy and laity of our church are committed to living together with love and grace as we continue to learn from one another and seek a path that honors God.” The first reading of the marriage canon amendment passed at General Synod in 2016 — but only just. The misclassification of a single vote initially led to the body to believe the resolution had failed when, in fact, it had passed.This story was originally published by the Anglican Journal. Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Same-Sex Marriage Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI What the Anglican Church of Canada’s same-sex marriage vote means for its future By Matt GardnerPosted Sep 9, 2019 Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Pandemic puts some bishop retirements on hold, delays elections, alters…

first_imgPandemic puts some bishop retirements on hold, delays elections, alters dioceses’ consecration plans By David PaulsenPosted May 5, 2020 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service House of Bishops Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT COVID-19, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Consecrations, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls The consecration of the Rev. Poulson Reed as bishop coadjutor of the Diocese of Oklahoma is scheduled for May 30 here at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City. Photo: St. Paul’s Cathedral[Episcopal News Service] Calling a new bishop isn’t a simple task under normal conditions. Add a global pandemic to the timetable, and most Episcopal dioceses have had no choice but to adjust or freeze even their best-laid plans for leadership transitions.“We didn’t want to stop the timeline if we could possibly do it,” said the Rev. Linda Anderson, who co-chairs the Diocese of Wyoming committee that is reviewing candidates to replace Bishop John Smylie, who is retiring in early 2021. The search committee had scheduled a retreat last week with the semifinalists, and “there were some panicky moments when we thought, this can’t possibly happen,” Anderson told Episcopal News Service.Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the committee’s retreat proceeded mostly as planned – not in person, but as a two-day online video conference. For now, the Diocese of Wyoming remains on track to announce its slate of nominees this month in anticipation of an election at the diocesan convention in September.That may be the best scenario any diocese can hope for this year.With 17 domestic dioceses now in various stages of transition – from the sitting bishop’s initial retirement announcement to the incoming bishop’s pending consecration – all have had to shift gears to some degree. The typical process of discernment, applications, face-to-face interviews, elections and consecrations has been thwarted by governors’ stay-at-home orders, travel restrictions and social-distancing precautions intended to slow the coronavirus’ spread.READ MORE: Status of bishop transitions, diocese by dioceseChicago Bishop Jeffrey Lee and Pittsburgh Bishop Dorsey McConnell each announced they would postpone their retirements to help their dioceses navigate the developing crisis. Other dioceses, including Milwaukee, South Carolina and Springfield, have put their searches on hold for now in response to the pandemic.Five dioceses have consecrations pending: Georgia, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Missouri and Alabama. Oklahoma’s and Missouri’s had been scheduled for April but were delayed. Now, the five dioceses have ceremonies scheduled from end of May to the end of June. All are being scaled down nearly to the minimum number of participants to reduce risk of transmitting infections. Backup plans are in place, in case the chosen consecrating bishops can’t make it.The Rev. Poulson Reed. Photo: Diocese of OklahomaThe Diocese of Oklahoma had been planning for about 4,000 people to gather April 18 in the Oklahoma City University field house for the consecration of the Rev. Poulson Reed as bishop coadjutor, a transitional role that puts him in line to take over when Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny retires at the end of the year.Instead, only about 10 people are now expected to participate May 30 in the service, to be held at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City. “The consecrating bishops will be sitting six feet apart,” Konieczny said in an interview with ENS. Before and after the ceremonial laying of hands on the new bishop, everyone will engage in a round of hand-washing.Consecrations typically are attended by more than enough bishops to meet the three-bishop minimum, but this ceremony requires contingency plans. Konieczny said he has at least two bishops on call if needed. Konieczny is scheduled to be one of the consecrators, along with Bishop Peter Eaton of the Diocese of Southeast Florida.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry was to serve as Reed’s chief consecrator, but the church issued a scheduling update on May 5 that indicated Arkansas Bishop Larry Benfield, president of The Episcopal Church’s Province VII, has been assigned to take Curry’s place.A news release specified that Georgia Bishop Scott Benhase will be chief consecrator on May 30 in Savannah for the consecration of Bishop-elect Frank Logue, and in Minnesota, Bishop Brian Prior will be chief consecrator on June 6 when the Very Rev. Craig Loya is consecrated as Prior’s successor.Retiring bishops commonly serve as consecrators for their successors. In most cases, the presiding bishop is chief consecrator, though Episcopal Church Canons say that role can be delegated to other bishops as necessary.“In the midst of this COVID-19 pandemic, we are now at one of those threshold moments when important and significant decisions must be made on all levels of our global community for the good and the well-being of the entire human family,” Curry said in the news release announcing the updates. “Federal, state, and local authorities continue to issue new guidelines on travel and in-person gatherings. I ask your prayers for the church, our suffering world and all dioceses awaiting consecration of their next bishop.”The release also repeated The Episcopal Church’s earlier recommendations for consecration planning, including smaller venues, limited in-person attendance, no social events and expanded livestream options.If not for the pandemic, the Diocese of Georgia would have planned for about 1,500 people at Logue’s consecration. As of late last week, the diocese still hadn’t finalized a location, though attendance will be limited: three consecrating bishops, two priests, two laypersons, a registrar, and the bishop elect.Add a person to run the livestream, and that’s 10 people, Logue said in a phone interview. With Georgia starting to ease its stay-at-home guidelines, Logue’s consecration might grow to about 20 people, while still emphasizing social distancing.The Rev. Frank Logue. Photo: Diocese of Georgia“If it’s for safety, I want us to be safe,” Logue told ENS. As Georgia’s canon to the ordinary, he sees a silver lining in the way that the whole diocese will be able to participate virtually on Facebook and YouTube. “In a way, you’ll sort of see more people than you might have otherwise,” he said. “There is something really quite wonderful about it.”Standing committees across the church, meanwhile, have been forced to make tough decisions about how to proceed with their bishop searches.Oregon is the only diocese that is looking ahead to an election after announcing a slate of nominees. The diocese announced April 7 that it would delay the election from June 27 to Aug. 29, and nominees will be invited to meet in person with members of the diocese Aug. 9-14.“Our hope is that there will be a window of opportunity from a health and safety perspective, allowing us to meet our candidates and for them to come to know Oregon,” the Standing Committee said.The Diocese of Iowa, on the other hand, isn’t scheduled to elect a new bishop to take over for retiring Bishop Alan Scarfe until May 2021. Iowa’s Bishop Search and Nominating Committee formed recently, and though it had to shift its in-person listening sessions to online conferences, the process hasn’t slowed down so far, according to the Rev. Meg Wagner, missioner for communications.In the Diocese of Pittsburgh, McConnell announced April 16 that he would postpone his retirement until September 2021, allowing for the Standing Committee to delay election of his successor. It is now scheduled for a special convention in April 2021.“Extending my tenure by a few months will allow some continuity of pastoral care as we all try to get back on our feet once the worst has past,” McConnell said in his announcement.Lee, the Chicago bishop, expressed similar motivations for delaying his retirement.“I want to ensure stable leadership in the diocese, particularly in this initial part of the crisis,” Lee told ENS. He added that he is reluctant to specify new dates for the transition process, given the prevailing uncertainty while COVID-19 cases continue to rise.Chicago Bishop Jeffrey Lee. Photo: Diocese of ChicagoThe Diocese of Chicago initially had planned an election on June 20 at a special convention. It may be able to reschedule the election to take place at the diocesan convention in November, though even plans for that large gathering are now tentative at best.“I’m dubious that any of us are going to be able to gather 700 together in a hotel ballroom,” Lee said.For other dioceses, this crisis has threatened to dramatically alter the course of their searches. In the Diocese of Milwaukee, which encompasses the southern third of Wisconsin, the Standing Committee announced that COVID-19 will not change Bishop Steven Miller’s plans to retire at the end of 2020, but the diocese is abandoning its former timeline for electing Miller’s permanent replacement.Instead, Milwaukee is working with Bishop Todd Ousley, who leads The Episcopal Church’s Office of Pastoral Development, on a more gradual plan that will carry the diocese through the next several years. With Ousley’s help, the diocese hopes to appoint an assistant bishop for a year, with the expectation that the bishop would be elected bishop provisional for an additional three years.The extra time “will allow us to look at some of the issues in our diocesan life that need attention: who we are as a people, what are we looking for in our next bishop, and our own faith, gifts and passion as a diocesan community,” the Standing Committee said in its April 29 announcement. “And along with examining our life as a diocese, we feel that this time will offer us the space to explore an intentional dialogue with our neighboring Wisconsin dioceses.”The Diocese of South Carolina, which covers the southeast half of the state along the Atlantic coast, has been led since 2012 by provisional bishops, most recently Bishop Skip Adams, who retired in December 2019. The diocese had hoped to elect a new bishop at its convention in November 2020, but on April 22 it announced a “pause” in the search.“Our primary reason for making this decision was to safeguard the integrity of the discernment process for possible candidates, the Search Committee, and the diocese,” the Rev. Caleb Lee, president of the Standing Committee, said in a letter to the diocese. Amid the uncertainty caused by the pandemic, he was unable to say when a new date could be set for electing a bishop.Despite the upheaval in leadership transition processes, diocesan leaders have emphasized reasons for hope.“We have great people in this diocese; people who have endured much and yet still rise to unprecedented challenges with grace and unbelievable faithfulness,” the South Carolina Standing Committee president said in his letter to the diocese.Logue has been encouraged by how dioceses and congregations are using livestreams to reach worshipping communities. He has participated virtually in the ordinations of priests and deacons, which have continued during the pandemic with small gatherings. And the Rev. J. Sierra Reyes, the Colorado priest Logue asked to preach at his consecration, is recording her sermon for a video that will be played during the service.Even before the pandemic, Wyoming’s search committee had been meeting by Zoom to save time and money – “In Wyoming, we have long distances” – so it was natural to move the in-person retreat to an online one, said Anderson, the co-chair and a priest at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Worland, Wyoming.On April 28, the committee members and four semifinalists began the retreat in the evening with a dinner by video conference. For the next two days, the candidates rotated through various activities with committee members, and each candidate was required to lead one virtual prayer service. The retreat concluded with a “leaderless activity” in which the candidates for bishop were given a hypothetical scenario and asked to discuss it with each other while the search committee listened.“It worked for us,” Anderson said. “Of course, not as wonderful as it would have been in person, but it was better than I even had hoped.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] of bishop transitions, diocese by dioceseEpiscopal News Service obtained the following information about how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting bishop searches through emails and interviews with diocesan leaders, as well as from dioceses’ online updates about their processes. Some plans likely will change further as the pandemic progresses.Diocese: GeorgiaWho: With Georgia Bishop Scott Benhase retiring, the Rev. Frank Logue, the diocese’s canon to the ordinary, was elected Nov. 16 to succeed him.Status/timeline: The diocese is proceeding with the consecration on its originally scheduled date, May 30.The COVID-19 effect: The consecration service will be limited to 10 to 20 people, instead of the 1,500 to 2,000 initially expected, at a church in Savannah. The service will be livestreamed on Facebook and YouTube. The Rev. J. Sierra Reyes, a priest in Colorado, will record a video of her sermon to be played during the service.Diocese: OklahomaWho: Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny is retiring at the end of this year. The Rev. Poulson Reed was elected Dec. 14 to be the diocese’s next bishop.Status/timeline: Reed was to be consecrated as bishop coadjutor on April 18, but the service has been delayed to May 30.The COVID-19 effect: In addition to the delay, the location was moved from Oklahoma City University’s field house to St. Paul’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City, with only about 10 people expected to attend. Previously, the diocese was planning for 4,000. The service will be livestreamed, and a larger celebration is expected in November at the diocese’s convention.Diocese: MinnesotaWho: Minnesota Bishop Brian Prior is preparing to hand the reins of the diocese to the Very Rev. Craig Loya, who was elected on Jan. 25.Status and timeline: Loya’s consecration date, June 6, has not changed.The COVID-19 effect: In-person attendance at St. Mark’s Cathedral in Minneapolis likely will be limited to 15 people, based on public health guidelines, though a livestream is planned. Prior will serve as the chief consecrator. A larger celebration will be planned for a later date.Diocese: MissouriWho: Missouri Bishop Wayne Smith is retiring, and the Rev. Deon Johnson was elected Nov. 23 as Smith’s successor.Status and timeline: Johnson’s consecration is now scheduled for June 13, instead of April 25 as was originally planned.The COVID-19 effect: The diocese is preparing for two scenarios: one in which 50 people will be allowed to attend and one with only 10 people. Either way, it will be livestreamed and participants will follow physical distancing and sanitation precautions. The co-consecrating bishops will travel by car, and other bishops are ready to make the trip if necessary.Diocese: AlabamaWho: The Rev. Glenda Curry was elected bishop coadjutor on Jan. 18 and will lead the diocese after Alabama Bishop Kee Sloan retires at the end of 2020.Status and timeline: Curry’s consecration date, June 27, has not changed.The COVID-19 effect: While the diocese is revising its plans because public health guidelines have limited the number of people who can attend in person, all are invited to watch live on Alabama’s Facebook page. An in-person celebration is expected when Curry is installed as diocesan bishop on Jan. 9, 2021.Diocese: ChicagoWho: Chicago Bishop Jeffrey Lee announced in February 2019 that he planned to retire in August 2020, and he called for the election of his successor.Status and timeline: Lee said he will postpone his retirement because of the pandemic, pushing back the timeline for the election.The COVID-19 effect: The Standing Committee said it would like to reschedule the election for the diocesan convention in November, though those plans are tentative.Diocese: OregonWho: Oregon Bishop Michael Hanley announced in May 2019 his plans to retire in January 2021.Status and timeline: The diocese announced a slate of four candidates for bishop in March 2020, but a month later, it delayed the election from June 27 to Aug 29.The COVID-19 effect: According to an April 7 update, the diocese has rescheduled face-to-face meetings with the nominees to Aug. 9-14. A further update is expected soon.Diocese: WyomingWho: In April 2019, Wyoming Bishop John Smylie announced he is retiring in early 2021.Status and timeline: So far, the pandemic has not delayed the diocese’s plans to elect a new bishop at the diocesan convention this September, with a consecration expected in February 2021.The COVID-19 effect: A late-April retreat with four semifinalists was held by the video conference software Zoom rather than in person. After nominees are announced, the diocese still hopes to hold face-to-face meetings in person, though it is considering the possibility of virtual meetings with the nominees.Diocese: West VirginiaWho: In October 2019, West Virginia Bishop Mike Klusmeyer called for the election of a bishop coadjutor, though he didn’t set a date for his retirement.Status and timeline: Under the initial timeline, a coadjutor was to be consecrated in June 2021. That timeline hasn’t changed under the pandemic, though a new date may be required.The COVID-19 effect: The outbreak “has forced us to pause in our process and discern safe and creative ways to move forward,” said John Valentine, president of the Standing Committee. The committee continues to meet online, and it has formed a Search and Nominating Committee.Diocese: PittsburghWho: Pittsburgh Bishop Dorsey McConnell announced in December 2019 that he planned to retire in spring 2021.Status and timeline: Last month, McConnell postponed his retirement as his diocese responded to the pandemic. Election of his successor now is scheduled for April 2021, in time for him to retire in September 2021.The COVID-19 effect: The new timeline “may allow some clergy, who sense a call to be the next bishop but are reluctant to leave their parishes so soon after this crisis, to be more willing to be considered given a bit more time for everyone to heal,” McConnell said.Diocese: IowaWho: Iowa Bishop Alan Scarfe announced in October 2019 he plans to retire in September 2021.Status and timeline: Election of Scarfe’s successor isn’t scheduled until May 2021, and the pandemic has not yet affected that timeline.The COVID-19 effect: The Bishop Search and Nominating Committee recently formed. It switched its in-person meetings to Zoom calls, and it is looking for new ways to receive input from members of the diocese as it develops a bishop profile for the search.Diocese: UtahWho: In October 2019, Utah Bishop Scott Hayashi announced his intention to retire.Status and timeline: Hayashi’s initial announcement suggested an election in April 2021 and a consecration of the new bishop that October. The Standing Committee recently decided to delay the search process by 60-90 days.The COVID-19 effect: Because of that delay, the Nominating Committee is expected to release a profile for the bishop search in September.Diocese: MilwaukeeWho: Milwaukee Bishop Steven Miller announced in August 2019 that he planned to retire in November 2020.Status and timeline: On April 29, Miller issued a letter to the diocese saying he still plans to step down by the end of 2020, but an election of his permanent successor has been shelved for now.The COVID-19 effect: The Standing Committee issued a companion letter to the diocese explaining that it plans to find an assistant bishop to “hit the ground running” after Miller retires. After a year, that bishop could be elected as provisional bishop for three years, until the diocese is ready to complete the full bishop search process.Diocese: NevadaWho: Nevada has been without a diocesan bishop since Bishop Dan Edwards retired at the end of 2018. The diocese selected Bishop Jim Waggoner as assisting bishop in the interim.Status and timeline: A search committee had recommended a slate of nominees in 2018, but the Standing Committee decided to start over and develop a new crop of candidates. In February 2020, the diocese announced that the work of a new search committee was underway.Diocese: North DakotaWho: The diocese has been without a bishop since the retirement of Bishop Michael Smith in May 2019.Status and timeline: The diocese had launched a discernment process to chart its path forward, and that process was gaining momentum when the pandemic hit.The COVID-19 effect: Much of the discernment process has involved soliciting and reviewing input from Episcopalians, and those efforts have proceeded despite the pandemic. After releasing a “common themes” document in April, the Diocesan Discernment Task Force is collecting follow-up information through an online survey. A meeting is scheduled for June.Diocese: South CarolinaWho: Bishop Skip Adams, who served South Carolina as a provisional bishop, retired in December 2019.Status and timeline: The Standing Committee announced a “pause” in its search on April 22, casting doubt on a timeline that called for electing a new bishop at the diocese’s November 2020 convention.The COVID-19 effect: “The good news,” according to the Rev. Caleb Lee, president of the Standing Committee, is that the search committee is “at a point in the process where a pause can be easily managed.” When the Standing Committee decides to move forward again, it should be able to go right into receiving nominations.Diocese: SpringfieldWho: Springfield Bishop Daniel Martins announced in October 2019 he plans to retire in 2021.Status and timeline: In his announcement, Martins called for the election of his successor, to be consecrated in June 2021, though that date now is up in the air.The COVID-19 effect: The Standing Committee decided “to put the process on hold indefinitely,” Martins told ENS by email. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Elections, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

Purdue University Senior Takes First Place at the National “Make It…

first_img Previous articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for March 28, 2018Next articleMexico and Canada Face U.S. Tariffs If NAFTA Talks Extend Beyond May Hoosier Ag Today Purdue University Senior Takes First Place at the National “Make It With Wool” Contest Facebook Twitter SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Mar 28, 2018 Purdue University Senior Claire Lee, of Indianapolis, was awarded first place in the Senior Category at the National Make It With Wool Contest held in San Antonio, Texas.  Claire made a floral wool dress and blue wool lined coat ensemble. The national contest was held at the American Sheep Industry annual meeting.  Claire will serve as the Senior Ambassador at next year’s competition in New Orleans.The national competition showcases and promotes the beauty and versatility of wool fabrics, yarns, and fibers and encourages personal creativity in sewing, knitting, crocheting, spinning, weaving, and other needlework arts. All contestants must select, construct, and model their own garment(s) made from more than 60 percent wool content. Contestants were judged on overall appearance of the outfit, sewing construction of all three garments and overall fit.Zionsville Community High School senior Molly Grotjan, 17, was awarded fifth place in the Junior category with her navy blue lined skirt, lined color-blocked cream and navy top, and navy, gray and cream colored cape with button closure.Anita Hardwick of Crawfordsville, was awarded fifth place in the Adult category with her blue and ivory wool blazer, top and skirt outfit.The national contest is sponsored by the American Wool Council, the American Sheep Industry, and American Sheep Industry Women. The state contest is sponsored by the Indiana Sheep Association.For more information about Indiana’s state contest on Sunday, August 5 during the Indiana State Fair, visit the Indiana Make it With Wool facebook page, or visit the National Make It with Wool Contest website. Entry forms will be made available in April. Deadline for entry is July 6, 2018. Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Purdue University Senior Takes First Place at the National “Make It With… SHARElast_img read more

Police harass five journalists in bid to stop them launching independent newspaper in Hanoi

first_img August 21, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Police harass five journalists in bid to stop them launching independent newspaper in Hanoi Help by sharing this information RSF laureates support jailed Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trang Organisation News VietnamAsia – Pacific to go further Receive email alerts Follow the news on Vietnam News Vietnam sentences journalist Tran Thi Tuyet Dieu to eight years in prisoncenter_img VietnamAsia – Pacific News April 22, 2021 Find out more April 27, 2021 Find out more Three more independent reporters arrested in Vietnam RSF_en News The Vietnamese authorities are trying to block the emergence of an independent press, Reporters Without Borders said today, condemning the constant harassment since 12 August of five journalists who are planning to launch out a new independent newspaper called Tu do Dan Chu (Freedom and Democracy).“The daily harassment of dissident journalists is standard practice by the police, who regard all news media as propaganda organs,” the press freedom organisation said. “Clandestinity is often the only alternative to self-censorship and to the government’s refusal to give licences to independent journalists. We call on the authorities to stop this harassment and let this newspaper appear.”In their efforts to prevent the newspaper’s launch, which was originally scheduled for 15 August, the Hanoi police have been keeping its five leading journalists – editor Hoang Tien, deputy editor Nguyen Khac Toan, reporter Nguyen Van Dai, editorial secretary Duong Thi Xuan and layout editor Bach Ngoc Duong -under surveillance and summoning them for questioning almost every day since 12 August. Their homes have been searched and their mobile phones, computer equipment and many of their files have been confiscated by police officers acting without a warrant. They have also been banned from meeting or leaving the capital. But they refuse to bow to the pressure and still hope to bring out their first issue on 2 September, the national holiday.Freedom and Democracy is not the first newspaper to receive this kind of harassment. Similar pressure was put on Catholic priest Chan Tin, the editor of the first independent publication to be launched this year, Freedom of Expression. Nonetheless, he was able to bring it out as an underground newspaper. Several of the Freedom and Democracy journalists helped with Freedom of Expression, which is still published on the Internet and is probably also distributed in hard copy in Hue, the capital of the central province of Thua Thien. April 7, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

4-week-old infant’s carseat hit with shotgun pellets in Limerick shooting

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Advertisement TAGScircuit courtJohn LysaghtJudge Tom O’DonnelllimerickSean Finnan Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash News4-week-old infant’s carseat hit with shotgun pellets in Limerick shootingBy Staff Reporter – March 29, 2017 1987 WhatsApp Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Email Printcenter_img Linkedin Facebook Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Twitter WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick man John Lysaght was given a suspended sentenceA YOUNG Limerick mother watched as her partner was shot by masked gunmen at the front door of their home while her four-week old infant and two year old child slept inside, a court has heard.The evidence was given in the sentencing hearing of John Lysaght (27) originally from Prospect but with an address in Askeaton, who pleaded guilty to a firearms offence at Limerick Circuit Court.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Garda Sgt Brian O’Connor, told the court that on December 12, 2013, a shooting was carried out at the home shared by Sean Finnan and his partner Leanne Casey.Ms Casey said that she went outside her house to where Sean was smoking. She said that she noticed a masked man who approached their gate as the couple was returning inside.Shots were discharged and Sean Finnan was struck by 24 pellets in the abdomen, chest and hands.Ms Casey described how shotgun pellets “spattered” the house and how some struck the car seat in which her four week old baby was sitting.One month later, two men were arrested, one of which was Ian Horgan, a convicted rapist and killer originally from Cork but who had relocated to the Prospect area.He was charged in connection with the incident but a jury acquitted him of the possession of a firearm with the intent to endanger life.Lysaght, who admitted standing behind the shooter, pleaded guilty to the lesser charge of the reckless discharge of a firearm.In his interviews with Gardai, Lysaght said that he met a man and bought drinks at a nearby off-licence and drank them locally before he and the shooter went for a walk.Lysaght said that the gun was produced from black plastic wrapping, loaded and then concealed up the sleeve of the shooter whom he did not name.There was history of a dispute between the shooter and the victim, the court heard.As the pair arrived at the gate, Lysaght said that the shooter walked up to the gate and there was a “load bang” as the shooting took place.The pair fled afterwards and went to an unnamed house and their clothes were burned after they changed.The court heard that Sean Finnan was not available to give evidence in the trial of Ian Horgan and that he was out of the jurisdiction.Prosecution Counsel John O’Sullivan said that as there was little or no evidence to attach Lysaght to the shooting, his admissions and guilty plea were welcome.Defending, Brian MacCartney QC said that it wasMr Lysaght’s admission that brought him to court and that his evidence was that he was “a good bit back” from the incident.He asked the court to take into account that the 27-year-old father of one, had changed his life, was employed and moved from the area.Judge O’Donnell recognises the position of the State that the accused was not the person who discharged the firearm., but he must bear the responsibilities of his actions as a willing participant.”Lysaght’s previous convictions for violent disorder and assault showed a propensity for violence, Judge O’Donnell said as he imposed four years, suspended for four years.“I am giving you a substantial chance,” Judge O’Donnell said. Previous articleWin cinema ticketsNext articleLocal fisherman honoured for his contributions to science Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie last_img read more

OHS celebrates its top 10 with lunch

first_img By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 Twitter OHS celebrates its top 10 with lunch WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Local Newscenter_img Eighteen-year-old Kathryn Spickermann talks about her future plans during the Top 10 lunch at Odessa High School Wednesday. Surrounded by family, friends and faculty, Odessa High School’s top 10 seniors were treated to a lunch and cake to celebrate to celebrate their accomplishments this week in the Performing Arts Center.“It’s an amazing group of young men and young ladies,” Principal Mauricio Marquez said. “Not only have they demonstrated great leadership for the entire campus, they’re involved in so many activities that it’s amazing to be able to accomplish academically what they’ve been able to do.”Most of the students were involved in fine arts, athletics and other activities on campus, but several also hold jobs and are involved in other organizations, Marquez said.“So the time commitment that each one of them has been involved in is just amazing,” he added.He said he was truly an honor and he was blessed to have these students on campus and he wishes them the best.“I can’t wait to see all the amazing things that they will accomplish throughout their career. … It’s that time of year for parents and teachers. It’s kind of bittersweet, to some degree. Graduation brings out a lot of emotions, especially getting to see the kids on their final journey as far as their education here in the district,” Marquez said.Last year was Marquez’ first commencement as OHS principal.“For me, it’s a little extra special in that I was blessed to be an elementary principal at one time, then obviously moved up to middle school, so many of my kids that will be graduating next Friday I’ve known since they were 5 years old. Getting the chance to see them coming in at 4 or 5 years old and now to be graduating high school it’s for me one of the highlights of my career,” Marquez said.The senior class, at this point, will have about 700 students. Marquez noted that final exams were ongoing Wednesday.Aldo Silva and Iris Ramirez, both 18, plan to attend University of Texas Permian Basin.After his sister became a nurse, Silva, who is ranked No. 9 in the senior class, said it sparked an interest in medicine.“In school, I discovered a passion for biology,” Silva said.He said it’s hard to describe how being in the top 10 feels.“I know my hard work paid off,” Silva said. “All those nights I had to decide on going out with friends, or staying at home and doing homework. It was worth it to stay at home and do homework.”His advice to younger students who want to aim for the top 10 is not to get discouraged if you don’t pass something.“We all go through ups and downs and it’s important that we look ahead and don’t let that bring us down,” Silva said.Ramirez, who is ranked No. 3, plans to study petroleum geology and establish herself in the oilfield after college. She also wants to build churches for her church.Being in the top 10, said Ramirez, is a privilege.“I’m proud I got to make it here with I guess you could call it the elite of OHS,” she said.Time management skills, she said, are essential to making the upper echelon of students because you have to juggle so many things.“You have to always keep a strict schedule and stick to it, despite problems that may arise in your life,” Ramirez said.Her motivation was to graduate.“… Being top 10 was always one of my biggest goals, so it was one of my biggest motivators. I need to keep perseveringso I can be in the top 10.Nicholas Arenivas, 18, plans to study mathematics at UT Austin and ultimately become a dentist.“My dentist allowed me to go shadow him and open up an opportunity for me to see if I (would) enjoy that career. When I went and shadowed him, I did enjoy all the things that he showed me,” Arenivas said.Asked how math and dentistry connect, he said he enjoys math and was told he could pick any major and go to dental school from there.“They said actually choosing a path that’s not directly science based, like biology or something, would give (you) a better chance of getting into dental school because it shows that you’re open to different things,” Arenivas said.Having been in the top 10 in middle school, Arenivas said he wanted to accomplish the same in high school. Seeing the top 10 sitting on stage at graduation and their parents with special seating is an honor, he said.His advice to younger students is to stay on top of their work so they don’t fall behind.“When it gets tough, just keep pushing through it because the reward is something good. You get into colleges and it just helps you with your career, but just stay on top of things, ask for help (and) don’t be afraid to speak up when you’re needing help,” Arenivas said.A lot of what motivated him was his mother.“She pushes me. She pushes me hard because she wants the best for me, not out of anything else but wanting the best for me and wanting me to be successful in my life and have a good job and support a family one day,” he said.Jiovanni Jimenez, who is in the No. 5 spot, said he plans to be pre-pharmacy and major in chemistry at UTPB.Jimenez, 18, said he developed an interest in science at a young age because his mother was a nurse.He said being in the top 10 is a pretty big accomplishment and he gives a lot of credit to his parents for helping him get there. Jimenez added that being in those rarefied ranks was not his goal in the beginning.“I was just taking the classes, and my motivation, I guess, would be preparing for college. Then I realized I was close to the top 10 and then I finally realized, ‘Oh, I actually made it in,’ so I was actually surprised,” Jimenez said.He said his advice to younger students is they should pursue the top 10 if that’s their goal, but they should keep in mind that it’s a lot of hard work. Facebook TAGS  Pinterest Twitter Previous articleFator on stage at Wagner NoëlNext articleRichard Milburn Acadmy logo RGB.jpg Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

Under Trump or Biden, GSE Reform Path is ‘Uncertain’

first_imgSign up for DS News Daily  Print This Post Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. Previous: The Housing Market’s ‘Remarkable Comeback’ Next: What Happens When Forbearance Programs Expire? Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago About Author: Christina Hughes Babb Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles 2020-10-15 Christina Hughes Babb The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago October 15, 2020 1,284 Views Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Under Trump or Biden, GSE Reform Path is ‘Uncertain’ In September 2019, President Donald Trump and his administration initiated a process whereby Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac would exit conservatorship. Former Freddie Mac CEO Don Layton, now a Senior Industry Fellow at Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies, says the White House waited too long to start and finish the entire process, which should involve keeping key reforms developed over the course of conservatorship (since 2008) in place. Thus, should Trump not serve another term, procedures would have to resume under a new administration.As the current administration launched the process with little more than a year left in its term, “it will not be able to complete many of the key requirements for conservatorship exit, and full re-capitalization until a possible second term, which is far from a certainty based on today’s election polls.”Layton went on to outline three possible scenarios, should former VP Joe Biden be elected in November, in his paper entitled, The Path of GSE Reform: Still Very Uncertain, and Not Just Because of the Elections.Inside the paper, Layton outlined three alternative approaches a Biden administration might adopt:”The first, and lowest risk, alternative is no change, i.e. to leave the companies in conservatorship for the time being.””The second, a medium-to-low risk alternative, is to end the conservatorships through a patient “administrative means” implementation of what is known as the utility model, where the safety-and-soundness regulator of the GSEs, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), also becomes like a public service commission to regulate their guarantee fees, much as utilities have their rates set by such commissions at the state level.””The last, and highest risk alternative recommended is a strong progressive program to convert the two GSEs into a single, government-owned corporation, which would require legislation as well as many years for that single corporation to become fully capitalized.”He also explains that, due to a case currently in the supreme court that would allow a new President to immediately replace the FHFA, appointed by Trump, rather than having to wait until 2024 for the current director’s five year term to end. That means “a Biden administration will have more ability to control GSE reform, under any scenario it chooses,” he said.Of the three alternatives, Layton recommends on a practical basis avoiding the government corporation alternative for two reasons:”First, as it requires so much change, it runs a high implementation risk, which can only work against a Biden administration because of its one-way nature. If the implementation goes well, the homeowning public will hardly notice; but if it goes poorly, the mortgage market disruption could generate major negative political ramifications,” he said. “Second, the government corporation alternative requires legislation. This would run up against the track record of Congress failing for more than a decade to put in the time needed to develop, and then make the compromises needed to reach agreement about, specific GSE reform legislation. This is especially true in the incredibly complex housing finance field where constructing well-designed legislation is a very heavy lift. Even if the Democrats control both houses of Congress, agreement is far from assured as there are definitely competing views among elected officials from that party about the right way to proceed.”Layton offers up suggestions for a possible second Trump administration. He thinks No. 3 is risky in any case.”There are many key decisions still to be made that can significantly impact [the GSEs’] business model—which in turn can materially change their future business prospects in terms of revenues, expenses, and return-on-equity, the single most important measure of success for a large financial institution … it is still quite uncertain how it will go or what could emerge at the other end.”Layton sees a long road ahead, no matter the outcome of the Presidential election:”Unfortunately, at this time, we really still have little idea of how long it will take for the GSEs, in any form, to exit the conservatorship and be able to operate normally (however that is defined at the time),” he wrote in his paper. “It’s true regardless of whether President Trump or Former Vice President Biden is sitting in the White House. All we can hope for then is that GSE reform design and implementation is done well in the future during the next four-year presidential administration, regardless of who leads it, to hopefully, at last, put this all to bed.”See Layton’s full editorial here, and more about the full paper, here. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Under Trump or Biden, GSE Reform Path is ‘Uncertain’ The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days agolast_img read more