Month: June 2021

Scotland v Ireland, the preview – blog

first_imgBy Rugby World reader, David BatemanAndy Robinson has unquestionably decided that attack is the best form of defence for Scotland against Ireland in this Sunday’s Six Nations clash at Murrayfield. After two consecutive losses- a courageous but unfruitful loss away to France and a disastrously demoralising 24-6 home defeat to Wales- everyone connected to Scottish Rugby knew something had to change.But even the most damning critics of Scotland’s performance against Wales will be surprised by the bold personnel changes Scotland’s head coach has made. In an effort to turn Scotland’s Six Nations campaign around, Robinson has announced seven changes to the team that started against Wales. Despite injuries ruling out Joe Ansbro and Hugo Southwell, that still represents a drastic re-organisation of the Scottish team.The most notable change is at perhaps Scotland’s biggest problem position: fly-half. Although a world-class kicker from hand when he is in top form, Dan Parks lack of attacking prowess and inconsistency has lead to Ruaridh Jackson being given his first Six Nations start, despite being yellow-carded last weekend in Glasgow’s 37-8 loss to Connacht. Jackson will certainly provide a more attacking impetus, although his lack of experience could prove fatal against Ireland’s veteran no.10 Ronan O’Gara, who starts for Ireland in place of Jonathan Sexton. Mike Blair should help the young stand-off to cope, though. He returns to the starting side, replacing Rory Lawson.Outside Jackson, Sean Lamont will receive his first start this campaign, after being one of very few Scotland players to escape severe criticism for their performance against Wales. Lamont will start at inside-centre, with Nick De Luca moving from inside to outside centre in the absence of Joe Ansbro. Lamont’s presence in-field should provide Jackson with confidence, and give Scotland solid go-forward ball. The latter is something Scotland have been lacking, often losing the ball at a crucial stage, or failing to gain ground from advantageous positions. For De Luca, this is a crucial game if he is to continue in the Scotland set-up. He is yet to prove himself at international level, shown by his mistake-ridden displays against France and Wales.Elsewhere in the backs, fan-favourite Chris Paterson returns for his 102nd cap at full-back, partly out of necessity, since both Hugo Southwell and Rory Lamont are injured. He is joined by Nikki Walker and Max Evans on the wings.Robinson’s changes to the backline indicate he is putting faith in his preferred expansive and flowing attacking style of rugby, rather than retreat to a more reserved and traditionally Scottish strategy. Such faith could end up being a stroke of genius, and Robinson should be applauded for sticking to his beliefs, particularly at a time when belief is hard to find in Scottish rugby.However, against a backline with the firepower of Ireland’s- D’Arcy, O’Driscoll, Bowe, Earls and Fitzgerald- it is a risky tactic to adopt, and one that has the potential to completely crush Scottish spirits. To a great extent, whether that happens or not will depend on how the Scottish pack plays. Should they give their own backs ball, there is plenty of talent there to score tries. But should they fail, the same could be said of the Irish backline.With their backs truly against the wall, there is only one thing the Scottish forwards can afford to do- come out fighting. Their recent performances have not befitted a Scottish national team, usually known for its determination and battling qualities, if nothing else.In an effort to rekindle those attributes, Robinson has turned to the enigmatic back-row trio known as the ‘Killer B’s’- John Barclay, Johnnie Beattie and Kelly Brown. Separate they are each very good players, but when united, they become outstanding. Questions have been raised about the inclusion of Beattie however, who only recently returned from injury. Replacing Nathan Hines at number 8, he will be vital to Scotland’s hope of delivering a greater attacking threat against Ireland.At lock the rampaging Richie Gray returns, an easy choice given his outstanding display against France, where the gigantic second row appeared to be at every tackle situation. Captain Al Kellock retains his place beside Gray.In the front row, Ross Ford and Allan Jacobsen are chosen again, joined by Moray Low. The Edinburgh prop replaces Euan Murray, unavailable because of his religious beliefs. Although this is a forced change, Low could potentially have ousted Murray regardless.With that plethora of changes in both the forwards and backs, Scotland are hoping to salvage some silver lining from a so-far dismal Six Nations tournament, in time for the World Cup in the autumn. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Even if they are not capable of beating Ireland, the set-up of this side should deliver the exact kind of entertaining, free-flowing rugby that Andy Robinson craves for this Scotland side. To win, they must improve their decision-making, match Ireland physically and show composure when seeking a try, or under pressure. If they can do that, they will have at least taken steps forward from the Welsh fixture.But ultimately, the real difference will come if Scotland believes in their own abilities, because despite their shameful performance against Wales, this is a good team. Here’s hoping they prove it this time around.last_img read more

Italy “A” names team for Churchill Cup debut

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Italy ‘A’ Coach Gianluca GuidiItaly “A” coach Gianluca Guidi has revealed the team that will face Canada in the Churchill Cup opener on Saturday June 4 at Franklin’s Gardens.The Azzurri, who are making their debut in the competition this weekend, will clash with the North Americans under the watchful eye of Italy Head Coach Nick Mallett, who will attend the game ahead of finalising his Rugby World Cup squad later this month.Speaking of his selection, Guidi said: “We will line up with some very experienced internationals such as Marco Bortolami, Mauro Bergamasco and team captain Valerio Bernabò, shoulder to shoulder with emerging guys such as Trevisan, hooker Tommaso D’Apice and centre Denis Majstorovic. All of them played very well in the Italian Championship this season and deserve their selection”.However, Guidi revealed he is expecting a tough challenge from the Canadians:“It will be a tough game, no doubt. Canada reached the Churchill Cup final in 2010, beating France in the pool phase, and the Canadians will be committed to perform at their best ahead of the upcoming Rugby World Cup” WORCESTER, ENGLAND – JANUARY 29: Gianluca Guidi, Head Coach of Italy looks on during the International match between England Saxons and Italy A at Sixways Stadium on January 29, 2011 in Worcester, England. (Photo by Matthew Lewis/Getty Images) Italy “A”15 Ruggero TREVISAN (BancaMonteParma Crociati)*14 Andrea BACCHETTI (Femi-CZ Rovigo, 2 caps)13 Denis MAJSTOROVIC (Estra I Cavalieri Prato)12 Matteo PRATICHETTI (MPS Aironi, 22 caps)11 Michele SEPE (Benetton Treviso, 3 caps)10 Riccardo BOCCHINO (MPS Aironi, 6 caps)*9 Tito TEBALDI (MPS Aironi, 14 caps)8 Manoa VOSAWAI (Benetton Treviso, 8 caps)7 Mauro BERGAMASCO (Stade Francais, 84 caps)6 Valerio BERNABO’ (Benetton Treviso, 19 caps) – captain5 Marco BORTOLAMI (MPS Aironi, 84 caps)4 Corniel VAN ZYL (Benetton Treviso)3 Fabio STAIBANO (MPS Aironi, 9 caps)2 Tommaso D’APICE (Futura Park Rugby Roma)*1 Alberto DE MARCHI (MPS Aironi)Replacements:16 Andrea MANICI (HBS GranDucato Parma)*17 Matias AGUERO (MPS Aironi, 17 caps)18 Dario CHISTOLINI (Petrarca Padova)19 Joshua FURNO (MPS Aironi)*20 Francesco MINTO (Benetton Treviso)21 Giulio TONIOLATTI (MPS Aironi, 5 caps)25 Durandt GERBER (HBS GranDucato Parma) Talking about his side’s debut in the competition, he added:“It is a privilege for us to compete in the Churchill Cup for the first time and we’ve picked an interesting squad, with some new guys emerging from the Union youth system. We’re working closely with Nick Mallett and his staff and we hope to give him indications for the World Cup”.Italy “A” vs. Canada, June 4, Franklin’s Gardens, 1430.last_img read more

Remembering Andy Ripley at the Virgin London Marathon

first_imgTwo years ago former Rugby World Editor, Paul Morgan was 125kg (about 20 stone in old money) and today he is 100kg. Part of the reason for the drop off in weight is to honour one of the great men of rugby, Andy Ripley and run the Virgin London Marathon in his honour.“It is a race I have  always wanted to run, especially as my wife (Jo) once finished 10th in the race in a time of 2hrs 32 mins, but never thought I would, being a little (!!) overweight,” says Paul (pictured below).Paul Morgan alongside Wilko“But, well Andy was a special guy who inspired a lot of people. I am one of them.”“So I am running this year’s London Marathon as part of Team PB, aising money for better support, information and research into prostate and breast cancer. “No I know loads of people run the London Marathon and even more do more amazing feats, and you get loads of requests for sponsorship.“But for me – well I never thought I would ever run 10 miles let alone 26 miles so I would ask you to dig deep in Andy’s memory, as I will be.” “Click this link to sponsor Paul and as Andy would say: ‘Stay Fab!’”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Could Sonny Bill Williams return to Union?

first_imgThose are the choices in front of Sonny Bill: try to play in the League World Cup; ignore that event but stay with the Roosters; head back to New Zealand and start playing Union again. After all, he has never been one to sign long-term deals or enter a contract without a built-in trapdoor.Whatever way you cut it and whatever you think about him, Sonny Bill Williams must be one of the most envied men in any code of rugby with the most scenic escape routes available to him. HAMILTON, NEW ZEALAND – AUGUST 04: Sonny Bill Williams during the Super Rugby final match between Chiefs and The Sharks at Waikato Stadium on August 04, 2012 in Hamilton, New Zealand. (Photo by Steve Haag/Gallo Images/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fan favourite: Men, women and children all seem to scream for Sonny Bill Williams, but will the All Blacks?By Alan DymockSOPHIE’S CHOICE is a heart-wrenching tale, too uncomfortable to consider. Sonny’s Choice, however, is one all of us would be jealous of.Sonny Bill Williams has missed out on selection for New Zealand’s Rugby League World Cup squad having dithered over his desire to play for the team, saying he probably shouldn’t travel with them due to “other commitments.” Yet he may well have had a change of heart and may seek to travel to England for the spectacle, according to some reports in Australia.Ignoring the fact that Williams appears to believe he has the luxury of picking and choosing what international coaches in different codes do, he has a chance to select from several attractive suitors over the next few seasons. Union Chief: Williams in 2012Having just won Australia’s League club grand final with the Sydney Roosters he has continued to enjoy great success in his career, but in missing out on the World Cup, rumours have spread behind Williams that he may consider switching codes once again to play Union in 2014.Fellow code-hopper Benji Marshall has recently signed up to the Auckland Blues and Sonny Bill would allegedly be welcomed back to the Waikato Chiefs with open arms, with the pair then able to set their sights on building towards the 2015 Rugby World Cup with the All Blacks. In a time when Ma’a Nonu is being repeatedly linked with a move to France while no Super 15 franchises want to touch him and with Conrad Smith set to rest for the duration of the All Blacks’ November tour at the end of 2013 there is a glimmer of hope for those wanting to see the League-reared pair feature for New Zealand in 2014 and beyond.last_img read more

150 years of the Calcutta Cup – the Scotland v England 1990 Grand Slam shootout

first_img TAGS: Book Review Skirmish: England’s Jeremy Guscott scraps with Tony Stanger and John Jeffrey during the match (Getty) The 1990 Grand Slam duel was a match for the ages. Played to a toxic political backdrop, the story of Scotland’s win is told in the classic book The Grudge, recently re-released BUY NOW from AmazonLet’s step back a few years. In 2010, former England and Lions hooker Brian Moore brought out one of the best rugby autobiographies ever published. Beware of the Dog won the William Hill Sports Book of the Year award and the Best Autobiography gong at the British Sports Book Awards held the following summer.Yet at those latter awards, it didn’t win the Rugby Book of the Year. That honour went to The Grudge, published then by Yellow Jersey Press and recently reissued by Polaris. Peter Burns, MD of Polaris, has published a tonne of outstanding books. His verdict on The Grudge? “It’s my favourite ever sports book.”Written by Tom English, a grand master of the writing world, it centres on the 1990 Calcutta Cup match that also doubled as a Triple Crown, championship and Grand Slam decider. Ironically, Moore is one of the central characters.From the very start, the brilliant prologue based on Jim Telfer’s final beasting of the Scottish forwards in the week of the match, you are hooked.English’s special talent is being able to transport you not only to playing fields and hotel rooms but to inside people’s minds. Happy to embrace a dash of poetic licence, he recreates both the dialogue that would have ensued and the innermost thoughts of the cast. He paints a scene with the artistry of a Turner or Constable.Men of legend: the 1990 Scotland side that made history by winning the country’s third Grand Slam (Getty)The match is insanely famous, of course, because it produced an against-the-odds victory for the Scots, one of only three Grand Slams in their history. It is equally entrenched in history for the toxic political backdrop. Maggie Thatcher’s incendiary poll tax policy, imposed on Scotland ahead of the rest of the UK, was the subject of a memorable Spitting Image sketch. It was also the catalyst for a storm of spite that reflected poorly on many.Jeremy Guscott, England’s try-scorer in the 13-7 defeat, says: “I’d never played a Test match in Edinburgh before. I’d heard everybody saying what a wonderful place it was, but I didn’t see that. As an Englishman you weren’t welcome there. I didn’t mind banter. I enjoyed it. But hate and jealousy, they’re evils really.”Moore and Will Carling in the one camp, and Telfer, John Jeffrey and Ian McGeechan in the other, are the book’s principal figures.Carling was inaccurately portrayed by sections of the Scottish media as Thatcher’s blue-eyed boy. In fact, he was a somewhat insecure 24-year-old in the early stages of his Test and captaincy career and still coming to terms with having to lead giants of the game like Mike Teague, Peter Winterbottom and Wade Dooley – Winterbottom had been his childhood hero.Moving on: Will Carling working with England as a leadership mentor at the 2019 World Cup (Getty)Years later, the England captain was labelled a ‘love rat’ by one tabloid and his reputation (and bank balance) nosedived to such an extent that he considered becoming a taxi driver. That may be but this reviewer warmed enormously to Carling in The Grudge, with his openness and honesty about shortcomings and vulnerabilities.And taking no nonsense, as when he was asked by a Scottish reporter what he thought about the whole of Scotland hating him. “No problem with it,” replied Carling. “I hate the Scots every bit as much as they hate me. It’s mutual loathing.”Looking for more great rugby reads? See the Best Rugby Books of 2020Telfer celebrated his 50th birthday on the day of the big match, 17 March, and the players gave him a cake in the shape of a tackle bag. The son of a shepherd who worked for the Duke of Roxburghe, Telfer was scornful of privilege and aligned with socialism from a young age.Double act: Ian McGeechan and, right, Jim Telfer in 2002. Two of the all-time great rugby coaches (Getty)As a coach, he was brutally hard on his charges, particularly on laid-back No 8 Derek White and hooker Kenny Milne, a pieman. Both players suffered from verbal lashings but also physically as Telfer would get them to lie on the ground while the rest of the pack trampled all over them in rucking practice.Head coach McGeechan was the Yin to Telfer’s Yang, a less forceful personality but revered for his wisdom and work ethic. A schoolteacher in Yorkshire, he would spend evenings analysing opponents on his video player, remote in one hand and a pen in the other. When his school boss started moaning that McGeechan was away too often doing his rugby, ‘Geech’ resigned and received a flood of job offers.Players Moore and Jeffrey each had a chip on their shoulders and were happy to keep them – anything that fuelled their drive and intensity made them better players. Both had toured with the Lions in 1989, a victorious mission achieved with a largely Anglo-Scottish squad. 150 years of the Calcutta Cup – the Scotland v England 1990 Grand Slam shootoutRugby’s oldest international fixture has reached a notable landmark. England and Scotland, who meet in the Six Nations on Saturday (4.45pm), will renew battle 150 years after the two nations first crossed swords at Raeburn Place, Edinburgh.The military metaphors have always felt apt for the Calcutta Cup. And never more so than for arguably the most legendary England-Scotland clash of them all 31 years ago. It was a match that spawned a book, a true and timeless classic.center_img Any friendships forged in Australia were forgotten come Grand Slam day, when England arrived as 1-4 favourites. They had blown away Ireland 23-0, then smashed France 26-7 at Parc des Princes – les Bleus’ biggest hiding in Paris for 60 years. Next, Wales were crushed 34-6 in a defeat so overwhelming that coach John Ryan quit the following day. England manager Geoff Cooke said there was a “stamp of greatness” about his team.Flying start: Brian Moore celebrates as Jeff Probyn scores against Ireland in the 1990 Five Nations (Getty)Cooke had been largely responsible for enforcing professional standards in the squad. In one of many sublime snapshots that provide crucial context for the Grand Slam match, English relates a savage drinking contest between Dooley and Steve Brain that took place on England’s 1985 tour of New Zealand. It occurred just three days before a Test against the All Blacks. “England’s idea of rest and recovery in the mid Eighties was having just the ten pints and calling it a night at 2am,” English writes.That was history by the time England rocked up at Murrayfield, however. Scotland’s players – a nominated quartet of Jeffrey, Finlay Calder, Gavin Hastings and skipper David Sole – had spent the previous fortnight praising England to the hilt.If the visitors were over-confident, it would not have been surprising. The Scots had scraped past Ireland with a late try by White (13-10), benefited from a sending-off and a freak change of wind against France (21-0), and won a poor-quality contest in Wales (13-9).Safely grasped: England’s Wade Dooley snaffles the ball ahead of replacement Derek Turnbull (Getty)But Scotland had planned an ambush. Telfer set out to destroy the English lineout, Dooley and Paul Ackford its pillars. The slow walk onto the field initiated by Sole, whilst not unnerving England’s players in itself, helped fire up the crowd and produced a cacophony of noise seldom heard before or since.An added ingredient was the passionate rendtion of Flower of Scotland, only the second time it had been sung at Murrayfield.The new anthem, which celebrates a famous victory by Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn in 1314, had replaced God Save the Queen because of the embarrassing booing that greeted the British national anthem.From the off, the Scots got momentum. They won a penalty for offside. Mickey Skinner complained and England were marched back 10m. Scotland stole a lineout, then won a scrum penalty after Milne got under Moore and popped him up. Scotland drove a maul 15m and it led to a penalty which Craig Chalmers kicked for the lead.England had never been behind in that year’s championship and suddenly they were having to search for answers. They were ruffled.They worked their way back but were ultimately undone by two major factors: first, the failure of referee David Bishop, a New Zealander, to award them a penalty try when Sole, under pressure from Jeff Probyn, repeatedly dropped the scrum on his own line.And second, a beautifully executed Scottish try straight after half-time, from a move they named Fiji, but which required a friendly bounce for scorer Tony Stanger. Did the wing actually touch the ball down? Even Telfer called it “dubious’. Watch the try below.No matter. Sport is all the richer for chance and controversy. Scotland got the job done and celebrated raucously, England retired to lick their wounds. Carling, who was spat at the next morning at Edinburgh airport, and Moore were among those who vowed never to lose to Scotland again – and they never did.A decade on from the book’s publication, English went for a few catch-up chats. He sat with Moore at the same table at the same Wimbledon coffee shop where they had spoken in 2010. He chatted to Geech in Leeds, and to Telfer in Galashiels. We are told about how life unfolded for them and indeed for all the players involved that unforgettable day.It brings the story, satisfyingly, up to date. But you suspect many Scots would be happy to be stuck in a time warp. 17 March 1990, the day England went to Murrayfield to collect their Grand Slam and had it ripped from their grasp by the auld enemy.BUY NOW from AmazonThe Grudge by Tom English is published by Polaris, RRP £14.99 for the hardback or £9.99 for the paperback. Don’t miss it.Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS We’ve done it! Chris Gray, David Sole and Finlay Calder celebrate at the final whistle (Getty Images)Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Watch: Sevu Reece kick creates incredible try for Crusaders

first_img Watch: Sevu Reece kick creates incredible try for CrusadersIt’s been torment for some rugby fans, waiting for Super Rugby Aotearoa to roll round again. And the opening tie of this new season did not disappoint as the reigning champ Crusaders downed the Highlanders 26-13. And among the highlights was one try worth drooling over.Check out this Bryn Hall five-pointer, made by quick hands and a savvy, hooked kick back into midfield from All Blacks wing Sevu Reece. Magical stuff. Check out this cracking try in Super Rugby Aotearoa LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Reece also got a try on his own – and fellow wing Leicester Fainga’anuku deserves credit for his work in the match. However, it was the kick from the roaming Reece that bagged a lot of the attention.Related: Who will broadcast Super Rugby in the UK in 2021? Man of the moment, Sevu Reece (Getty Images) For all of the excitement around this game, though, Highlanders boss Tony Brown was unimpressed with one aspect of the game.Crusaders not only attacked ruthlessly, but they put in a real rearguard shift. Something necessary, after receiving two yellow cards (including recent friendlies, the Crusaders have five yellows in two game). After this one, Brown talked about cynical play.Related: Super Rugby Aotearoa team guide“If you look at tonight’s game that’s what’s sad about rugby at the minute,” Brown said post-match. “We had 60% possession, 60% territory… We only concede eight penalties and they’re conceding 19 penalties and numerous penalty advantages against them and then two yellow cards and they still win. That’s the sad thing about footy.”After the game, Crusaders coach Scott Robertson denied there was anything cynical about the Crusaders’ play, and also singled out forwards coach Jason Ryan for how well the All Black-laden pack handled their defensive and set-piece duties. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Six Nations Team of Round Five

first_imgThe most assured full-back over the weekend was Keenan, the only man to play every minute of the tournament for Ireland. Imperious in the air, winning the ball for Jack Conan’s try, he’s one of those players who never seems to make rash decisions. 14. Keith Earls (Ireland) Never underestimate Earls. Utterly bamboozled Jonny May, a very fine defender, when England and Ireland were locked at 3-3 early on in Dublin. Mark Wilson was probably the only English player who has won credit from his side’s performance in Dublin. 7. Charles Ollivon (France) Absolutely monstrous performance. Scored to give France a sniff in the 77th minute, made 13 carries and 21 tackles (those poor shoulders), and it seems impossible to ground the ball for a try if he is defending anywhere in a ten-metre radius. Inconceivable that he managed to stop Gareth Davies. Nigel Owens retired. Wayne Barnes now the best ref in the world. Luke Pearce on course to be the next. Brilliant communicator under intense pressure & scrutiny.— Nick Mullins (@andNickMullins) March 20, 2021With 7m watching in the UK alone, he provided brilliant communication and clarity throughout.Who would make your Six Nations Team of Round Five? Email [email protected] to let us know. Collapse Six Nations Team of Round FiveWhat an incredible weekend – and it’s not even caveated by the sad realisation that this year’s Six Nations is nearly at an end (we’ll have to wait until Friday night to find out whether France or Wales will lift the trophy depending how les Bleus do against Scotland).Heroes and heartbreak, Lions and lambs, these three Super Saturday games had it all – from Scotland making more than a kilometre with the ball in hand, to Ireland getting the signature win of Andy Farrell’s reign, to one of the greatest matches for pure theatre that the competition has ever produced.SUPER SATURDAY MATCH VERDICTS Scotland secure try bonus point in 28 minutes against Italy Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition for magazine delivery to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Deserved a second after acrobatically dotting down a cross-field kick which he had no right to reach, but play was brought back for a knock-on earlier in the move. 13. Robbie Henshaw (Ireland)A warrior this championship – one of Ireland’s best players in every game. Saved his best performance for last with a huge first-half effort, filled with dominant tackles that utterly shut down England’s wide game. A Lion in waiting. It’s hard to make sense of it all, and this composite team from the fifth round of fixtures is more likely to stir things up than settle them down…Six Nations Team of Round Five 15. Hugo Keenan (Ireland) Brice Dulin was awarded Man of the Match in Paris; he was responsible for two glorious moments, but struggled under the high ball. Jack Conan finishes off a fantastic team score for Ireland! #GuinnessSixNations #IREvENG pic.twitter.com/PQNO9k0kKW— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) March 20, 2021CJ Stander’s retirement and this performance will very much put him in the frame for Ireland’s first-choice back row.Grégory Alldritt had yet another outstanding game for France.Referee: Luke Pearce (RFU) Not just an excuse to get an England representative into the team of the week, but a quick word for the unflappable Pearce on Saturday night. Keith Earls try sparks Ireland rout of England Late Brice Dulin try denies Wales a Grand Slam  11. Duhan van der Merwe (Scotland) It’s impossible to leave out a winger who made 220 metres and scored two tries. He beat 15 defenders against Italy, and is now joint with Thomas Castaignede for the most players dodged in a single Six Nations match. A debut tournament to remember.Related: Duhan van der Merwe’s rugby journey Find out who Jacob Whitehead has picked in his ‘dream team’ from Super Saturday Late Brice Dulin try denies Wales a Grand Slam  6. Josh Navidi (Wales) Never stops. It seems a long time ago that he came off the bench to replace the stricken Dan Lydiate in the tournament’s first game. Such a powerful leg drive for his team’s second try, and defensively irrepressible as the French attacked the Welsh line. Keith Earls try sparks Ireland rout of England Outshone the in-form Kyle Sinckler, and thankfully seems back to his best after his injury. 4. Tadhg Beirne (Ireland) Should be Six Nations Player of the Championship in 2021. Arguably Man of the Match in four of his five games, he’s played his way from the fringes of the Lions squad to a presumptive Test starter. 9. Conor Murray (Ireland)Ireland’s mission control. Recalled ahead of Jamison Gibson Park, he and Johnny Sexton were more Gardaí than old guard, stringently policing the areas England were allowed to play in.Conor Murray puts in a box kick against England (Getty Images)Had slightly fallen out of the Lions picture despite an outstanding tour four years ago – he’s firmly back in it now. 1. Wyn Jones (Wales) While Fabien Galthié thinks that Jones’s best quality is his ability to win red cards, above all the prop offered massive work-rate in Paris.Wyn Jones (right) helps to tackle Antoine Dupont (AFP/Getty Images)Made 12 tackles and 12 carries, the latter the highest figure of any front-rower all weekend. And he scrummaged well against the bullish Mohamed Haouas. 2. David Cherry (Scotland) Ken Owens was bristling with intensity for Wales, but it would be remiss not to credit Cherry for his two-try performance. He’s had an incredible journey to international rugby, and improbably made a front-of-the-lineout move work! No player in the tournament has hit more rucks than the Munster player. 5. Alun Wyn Jones (Wales) So nearly led Wales to a famous win. Made the most tackles of anyone apart from Italy’s overmatched Michele Lamaro and Niccolo Cannone, but also added 11 carries of his own and offloaded more than any other player in a red shirt. The most competitive position, with Virimi Vakatawa ascending again to his awesome heights for the first time in the tournament and Huw Jones making more metres than a ruler factory. 12. Gaël Fickou (France) France’s most talismanic back this tournament has been not Antoine Dupont but Fickou, the centre dragging his team back into contention in the final 20 minutes against Wales in Paris.Jonathan Davies was his typically canny self in the first half, but Fickou looked as if he could make a line break at any moment in the second.Provided the crucial touch of class for the final try, having the wherewithal to square his hips, delay his pass and fix George North, giving Dulin the space to scoot through. 10. Dan Biggar (Wales) The bigger the game, the better Biggar. Varied his tempo beautifully, with his kicking game as good as I’ve seen it, linking brilliantly with North and Davies, and offering a running threat of his own.Really risked his body to score Wales’ first try on the Jamie Roberts line. His best game of the tournament, and possibly reminded everyone why Wayne Pivac picks him to start over Callum Sheedy. Expand France centre Gael Fickou leads the attack against Wales (AFP/Getty Images) TAGS: Highlight Hamish Watson, Man of the Match in Scotland’s win, was also impressive. 8. Jack Conan (Ireland) Everywhere for 80 minutes. Outstanding athleticism and deftness to flick the ball inside to Earls for the winger’s try, and opportunistic to exploit a weak piece of guard work from Luke Cowan-Dickie for his own try. Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Scotland secure try bonus point in 28 minutes against Italy Keith Earls try sparks Ireland rout of England… Stuart Hogg’s side with a record 52-10 victory… The Scottish lineout capitulated last week – this week they won 15 of 16 throw-ins. 3. Tadhg Furlong (Ireland)It was Ireland’s scrum that really helped them pull away against England, and in a showdown of the 2017 Lions front row it was Furlong who triumphed, forcing Mako Vunipola to give away three scrum penalties. France win 32-30 in Paris to take title…last_img read more

VoD4ABC

first_img Steve Dawson says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ann-Marie Montague says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA July 4, 2012 at 6:21 pm Amen, dear sister, you’ve got it right on the money! What the Anglican Communion needs is a good dose of Dibley, and Gerry Granger is one vicar (of Christ or otherwise) who could give it to us! I’d vote no-no-no-no-no-YES on any day of the week…though of course that is not a Yank’s place, is it? Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 7, 2012 at 10:15 am Rev. Geraldine would certainly add a strong dose of humanity into the Anglican Communion! She would bring a re-newed vision of God’s loving presence into a church which too often looks backwards rather than looking at today and tomorrow. If I could, I would certainly vote for her over some other candidates who are more focused on maintaining the status quo or returning to the “good old days” of eras long past. Christ Himself was a person of His day and age; He cut through the red tape of His time and re-directed us towards what was important. I believe Christ would also vote for Geraldine! Br. James Teets BSG says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Danielle TumminioPosted Jul 3, 2012 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem VoD4ABC Or four reasons the vicar of Dibley is the best choice to lead the Anglican Communion Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 6, 2012 at 11:02 am This is well thought out and compelling! Seriously, though, a rural vicar, who needs these particular gifts and talents to navigate a multi-benefice team of parishes, would be an excellent choice for ABC. And, oh gosh, women often have these gifts! I say, let’s go for it!! Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 July 13, 2012 at 1:21 am Your reasoning alone qualifies YOU as a canidate.Find your hat & toss it in the ring. One day…………… Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments (4) Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rev’d Dr Susanna Metz says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Danielle Tumminio[Episcopal News Service] With General Convention upon us and the Church of England General Synod just around the corner, our communities are asking crucial, weighty, and imperative questions, like:How should we allocate our resources?How should we interact with secular governments?And who should be our next archbishop of Canterbury?While the last of these questions will be decided in the Church of England, it is nonetheless worthwhile for all members of the Anglican Communion voice their opinion on this vital leadership role so that we grow in knowledge and awareness of how we want our church to be nurtured in the coming years.Which is what I am doing today.While Archbishop John Sentamu and Bishop Richard Chartres are currently the most talked about candidates for the titular head of the Anglican Communion, it has come to my attention that we have overlooked one of the brightest, most compelling voices of the modern church, one who would be an able, strong, and confident leader who could guide our communities with wisdom and grace in the years ahead.So I would like to propose another candidate, an outsider certainly, but one who, I believe, would offer the kind of leadership necessary to move our church forward in its mission and ministry. My choice for the next archbishop of Canterbury:Vicar Geraldine Granger of Dibley.Or, to provide a catchy motto for her candidacy: VoD4ABC.Now, dear canonically-aware readers, let me anticipate your critiques, as I can see you raising your hands in my mind’s eye, ready to object to my candidate: Geraldine Granger is a woman, you say. And since women can’t be bishops in the United Kingdom, it’s impossible for her to ascend to the post of archbishop.Plus, she’s fictional.These are, I admit, itsy bitsy problems, but not insurmountable ones. Forsooth: While the Church of England doesn’t have any women bishops, they simultaneously have no rules barring fictional bishops. That she is fictional, therefore, permits her to run for the post in a way that trumps the gender prohibition: As a fictional character, none of her physical attributes are real, thereby rendering her canonically indistinguishable from a male fictional character.In other words, she’s fair game for ABC. So is the more recent Adam Smallbone from the BBC show “Rev.” —but I don’t think he’s quite as compelling candidate, though you may disagree with me.(Also, if you are finding flaws in my logic, you’re taking things a bit too seriously.)Anyway, now that we have gotten the heavy legalities out of the way, allow me to sway you, dear reader, with four reasons why Vicar Geraldine Granger is the finest, Grade-A choice to lead the Anglican Communion forward in these turbulent times:1. She can navigate contentious communities: It is true that the Anglican Communion has experienced some tension and conflict over the previous decade. Geraldine Granger would, no doubt, be skilled at traversing such terrain. After all, the Vicar’s arrival in Dibley was not without dissension: David Horton—a wealthy member of the parish council (aka vestry) and district councillor for Dibley and Whitworth (aka politician)—vociferously disapproved of the Bishop appointing a woman as his community’s spiritual guide. Though he tried to remove her from her post, the vicar displayed no reactivity or indignation, humbly focusing instead on her calling as pastor, teacher, and evangelist for her community. By the end of her first week in Dibley, the vicar multiplied Sunday attendance by 1,750 percent, welcoming those of all racial, sexual, and educational orientations. The community emerged more cohesive—yet respectful of difference—and, most importantly, able to grow in their mission and ministry together. Not only, then, did the vicar show grace under fire, but she also proved herself to be an incredible evangelist, even in tendentious times.2. She’s accustomed to media scrutiny: The archbishop of Canterbury is not only the leader the Anglican Communion but also the voice of the Anglican Communion. The archbishop must be comfortable in front of cameras, journalists, and microphones, gifted not only as a preacher but also as a media personality and giver-of-sound bites. The vicar has shown such savvy. Early in her tenure, the vicar allowed television cameras into St. Barnabas to film Songs of Praise, a BBC television series that explores the music and faith of communities throughout the United Kingdom. Later, she participated in a series of interviews with radio and print media to discuss her choice to be a female priest, which eventually led to the paparazzi smearing her reputation as well as the reputation of various members of her congregation. The vicar responded to the media hysteria with humility, acknowledging her imperfections while never abandoning the ideals of the faith she held dear. (Plus, she’s got the kind of name recognition that would inevitably lead the curious but un-churched to sit themselves in our pews.)3. She guides her people well: As leader of the Anglican Communion, the archbishop must be adept at recognizing the many and varied gifts and cultures that make up our beloved denomination. Geraldine Granger has shown great skill in this regard. As Dibley’s vicar, she realized that every member of her congregation was unique, blessed by God, and because God loved them, she was called to do the same. As their leader, then, she tried to nurture their strengths so that they blossomed more fully into the people God intended for them to become. So, for instance, when Alice challenged Oxford-educated David Horton in the Village Quiz, the vicar recognized her intellectual gaps and crafted questions that empowered her, building on her strengths so that she gained confidence and felt more comfortable with the person God created her to be.4. She understands the essence of Christian mission: Finally, the archbishop must be someone who understands the essence of our call as Christians: to work with God to bring about a new heaven and a new earth in which suffering and pain are no more. We work together to accomplish this goal through Jesus’ command to love God and our neighbor. Yet, what it means to love God and neighbor is complicated, and we don’t always agree on what it looks like in practice. Indeed, if the controversy about female and homosexual leaders or the controversy over our current budget has shown anything, it has shown that we are at times deeply divided on the best way to love God and neighbor. And yet, it is imperative that we not get distracted from that question of how to love well, because only by seeking shall we find, only by knocking shall the door be open to us. This is clearly a priority for the vicar as well. As she herself preached, we are called to consider, “the big things, issues like, well, how much you help those who need help, how much you love people and show your love to them.”I am convinced that it will take a compelling, confident and compassionate leader to guide and pastor our communion. And though the Church of England may not be in a place right now to choose a “babe with a bob cut and a magnificent bosom,” as its titular head—nor will it likely choose a fictional character—perhaps we would do well to remember that we Christians are a people called to hope for a justice and peace that, with God’s help, will become our future. And while it’s tempting to say such a vision is unrealistic, that a new heaven and new earth is unattainable, we must continue to hope and work together, because that is our calling. That is what it means to be a Christ-follower.So while there may be a multitude of practical reasons to invalidate the Vicster’s candidacy, we cannot forget that it is our call to advocate for those things that transform, even when they seem unlikely or unattainable, because unless we hope, unless we try, they will never be a reality.And that, dear reader, may be the best reason of all to vote for the vicar: Because while her candidacy may seem unrealistic, her leadership would inevitably be transformative.And that, I believe, makes it worth fighting for.Note: To support Geraldine Granger’s candidacy for archbishop, visit the Vicster’s official candidacy page at: www.facebook.com/VoD4ABC– The Rev. Danielle Tumminio lectures at Yale University and is the author of “God and Harry Potter at Yale.” She currently serves as an interim associate at St. Anne in-the-Fields Episcopal Church in Lincoln, Massachusetts.Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more

England: Synod approves next steps for women to become bishops

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Church of England press release] The General Synod of the Church of England has Nov. 20 approved a package of measures as the next steps to enable women to become bishops.In the debate in the morning session the synod welcomed the package of proposals outlined in the report of the Steering Committee for the Draft Legislation of Women in the Episcopate (GS 1924).The Steering Committee’s package of proposals follows the mandate set by the synod in July and includes the first draft of a House of Bishops declaration and a disputes resolution procedure. This debate invited synod to welcome the proposals and the five guiding principles, already agreed by the House of Bishops, which underpin them.Proposing the package of measures Bishop James Langstaff of Rochester said: “These measures look to the day when the Church of England as an ecclesial entity will have made a clear decision to open all orders of ministry to women and men without distinction, whereby all those so ordained are true and lawful holders of the office which they occupy.”The following motion was carried this morning with 378 votes for, eight against and 25 abstentions:‘That this Synod, welcoming the package of proposals in GS 1924 and the statement of principles endorsed by the House of Bishops at paragraph 12 of GS 1886, invite the House of Bishops to bring to the Synod for consultation in February a draft declaration and proposals for a mandatory disputes resolution procedure which build on the agreement reached by the Steering Committee as a result of its facilitated discussions.”In its afternoon session, the synod also voted to progress the legislation to the next legislative stage of revision at its meeting in February 2014.As a result of the votes carried today, synod has agreed to dispense with the normal Revision Committee process and move straight to revision in full at synod which next meets in February 2014, thereby clearing the way for a possible vote on final approval later in 2014. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Women’s Ministry Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Nov 20, 2013 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest England: Synod approves next steps for women to become bishops Tags Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (1) Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL November 20, 2013 at 10:34 pm Justice delayed is justice denied!The ONLY reason women have not been ordained priests and bishops from the early days of the Christian Way, is that women were not considered fully human. Men, perhaps out of a need to control what they fear, kept women identified as a “thing” which BELONGED to a man.We know better now. We are having our own “Galileo moment” concerning the way God actually has created the human race, as opposed (where necessary) to what the Biblical writers thought and wrote. Women are fully human, neither things belonging to a neighbor (the 10th commandment) nor just dirt in which men plant their seed (Ps. 139:14-15).William J. Fleener, Sr.Priest of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Michigan The Rev. William J. Fleener, Sr. says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Local churches empower communities to stop Ebola spread

first_img Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags [Episcopal Relief & Development press release] In Liberia and Sierra Leone, Episcopal Relief & Development’s local Church partners are leveraging their widespread presence and trusted reputation to alleviate suffering and contain the Ebola outbreak that has killed 1,427 people in West Africa since March 2014.Partners in both countries are mobilizing local volunteers to promote accurate information about Ebola and distribute hygiene and sanitation supplies.  In addition, the Church in Liberia is supplying food parcels for households in quarantined communities and providing basic protective equipment for health workers at local hospitals.“The situation is extremely dire, due both to the severity of the disease and the difficulty in containing it,” said Abiy Seifu, Senior Program Officer for Episcopal Relief & Development.  “People want to care for sick family members at home, they are afraid to go to the clinics because so many are dying and there is a great deal of misinformation about how Ebola is spread.  Fear about the disease is making the outbreak worse, and we are aiming to combat this fear with accurate information and support for basic needs.”Local development staff of the Episcopal Church of Liberia are working with government health staff in Bong County to distribute food items such as rice, cooking oil and canned meat to 500 people in four quarantined rural communities.  Volunteers are delivering food and sanitation supplies to homes, and demonstrating correct mixing procedures for different concentrations of bleach water for hand-washing and cleaning.  The supplies also include a hand-washing station made by installing a spigot in a covered five-gallon bucket, and a poster with accurate information about how to prevent Ebola and what to do if a family member presents symptoms of the disease. Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Local churches empower communities to stop Ebola spread Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Relief & Development, Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Efforts in Liberia also include radio messaging in local dialects through 15 stations in nine counties and the distribution of bumper stickers with key messaging to churches of other denominations.The shipment of facemasks, gloves, gowns and other protective supplies from Episcopal Relief & Development’s Africa Regional Office in Ghana arrived in Liberia and were given to three area hospitals – Phebe Hospital, Redemption Hospital and C.H. Rennie Hospital – in a commissioning ceremony by The Most Rev. Jonathan B.B. Hart on August 26.In Sierra Leone, the Anglican Diocese of Bo is actively participating in the government District Health and Development Team’s planning and implementation process for Ebola control, specifically on detection and case management.  Diocesan staff trained local health volunteers who had already been active in the Church’s malaria and HIV prevention efforts to assist with education, case identification and contact tracing.  The volunteers also distributed hand-washing stations.Contact tracing is one of the most important but often most difficult aspects of disease control, especially because the incubation period between when a person contracts Ebola and when they show symptoms can range from two to 21 days.  Trusted local volunteers who are familiar with community members and their relationships and daily routines can be extremely helpful, both in identifying cases and contacts, and in encouraging their neighbors to follow the correct procedure when someone is sick or has died, in order to prevent further infection.“Some of the biggest challenges in stopping Ebola come from hiding sick people and treating them at home rather than seeking isolation and medical assistance, patients escaping quarantine and burial practices that do not contain the disease.  Culturally appropriate messaging and case management are essential in encouraging communities to adopt behaviors that will effectively combat Ebola,” Seifu said.Episcopal Relief & Development is currently in conversation with both the Church of Liberia and the Diocese of Bo in Sierra Leone regarding expansion of activities to reach remote communities and longer-term engagement to address the growing food crisis.  Restrictions on transportation and commerce due to quarantine are already causing shortages, but there may be a longer-term impact on livelihoods and food supply due to lack of market access and missed planting seasons.  In addition, families whose main breadwinner has fallen ill or died are particularly vulnerable.“One of the key strengths of our Church partners is that people know them and they can access areas that might be difficult for other organizations or even the government to reach,” said Seifu.  “I am very glad that the local government agencies have recognized this strength and that they can pool resources and expertise to implement a unified strategy.  This partnership is important now and will continue to be as the region recovers from this disaster.”Donations in support of Episcopal Relief & Development’s response to the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa may be designated to the Ebola Crisis Response Fund. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Africa, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Posted Aug 28, 2014 Text of health messaging poster being distributed in Liberia:You can stop EBOLA!Always wash your hands with soapDo not hide sick peopleDo not touch dead bodyDo not eat bush meatWhen you are sick with fever, headache, body pain, etc.Go to the hospital quick, quick, quickListen to health workers – they know how best to help youEBOLA can catch big people and small children Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Health & Healthcare Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more